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subaru impreza adaptive cruise control

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subaru impreza adaptive cruise control-2020 Subaru XV e-BOXER Hybrid: Snow Drive Event 2020 !

subaru impreza adaptive cruise control Post Review

2017 Subaru Impreza. Standard all-wheel drive and an excellent stop-and-go adaptive cruise control system. https://goo.gl/741pw2

• 2013 Subaru Impreza WRX STI• 2.0L Turbopetrol (EJ207)• 305hp/422Nm• ABS, AWD, 10 Airbags, Brembo Calipers, Adaptive Cruise Control• Pioneer System: Bluetooth, 6 speakers, CD/DVD Player, HDD, USB• Leather Bucket Seats, 18" STI Enkei Alloy Rims• Galleria• KSh2.5M

might be needing a new car sooner than i thought. so tell me what should i get next twitter?

I love my Subaru Impreza. What ever do get a car with camera assisted driving. Adaptive cruise control will change you life, and adds safety

2017 Subaru Impreza: Adaptive cruise control and all-wheel drive vault Impreza over the competition. http://ow.ly/qTkt30bexER

@caseyliss just heard the most recent Ask ATP. Having actually driven from NY to California this past June I can absolutely attest to the important of adaptive cruise control for my sanity. I made the drive in a Subaru Impreza 5dr w/ eyesight and wouldn’t have it any other way

The Subaru Impreza SECVT GearboxEyesight Technology - Adaptive Cruise Control2L - PetrolHeated Leather SeatsSat-Navigation with touch screen display +++++++ MUCH MOREPCP OFFERS AVAILABLE - LINK BELOW!!#Subaru @subaruuk #Subie #Impreza

To be fair, the auto industry has been doing a good job bringing cool features into cars people can actually afford.

For example, you can "Autopilot"-style adaptive cruise control/lane keep in a freaking Subaru Impreza that costs less than $25,000. Not bad.

Move to Reno and put up with a bitch of a commute…

subaru impreza adaptive cruise control Q&A Review

Why do you listen to audio books?

I have been a subscriber to ,audible.com, for a little over 10 years. During that period, I have purchased over 350 books — two per month as part of my subscription, and then some extras along the way. All different types: from fiction to non-fiction, self-help books and ,Great Courses,. I listen to a book every morning and evening weekday as part of my daily 20-minute commute. This essentially makes my commute stress free, especially when combined with the adaptive cruise control on our Subaru Impreza (see ,Tom Crosley's answer to What do you like and dislike about your Subaru?,), so I don’t have to deal with stop and go traffic. I actually look forward to my commute so I can continue my current book. At home, I don a pair of Bluetooth headphones, and listen to my current book while taking a 2-mile walk around the perimeter of our housing development. I try to do the same at work during lunch hour, where there is a 1-mile walk around the perimeter of the company’s campus. Listening to audio books lets me take my 350+ volume library with me wherever I go — the advantage I share with my Kindle e-books (I have over 550 volumes in my Kindle library). And in case you’re wondering, I read “real” books too.

How do you feel about driving a car that will decide to apply the brakes on its own?

We bought a new 2017 Subaru Impreza a little before Christmas. I use it for commuting to work. I had a 10-year-old Kia before, and I was interested in getting a car with all the new bells and whistles that are now available, so I did quite a bit of research beforehand and picked the Impreza as the best car under $30K which had the most new safety features. The Impreza has what Subaru calls ,Eyesight, technology. It uses two cameras mounted on either side of the front mirror: As a safety feature, both front and rear emergency braking are available. But the most useful feature is the adaptive cruise control — once I am on the freeway, I just turn it on and don’t have to put my foot on either the accelerator or brake pedal until I get off at my exit for work — it faithfully follows the car in front of me (if any), speeding up or slowing down (applying the brakes and slowing to a standstill in stop and go traffic if necessary and then starting up again). It has a screen that shows when it sees a car in front and is following it: The brake lights on the rear car in the diagram (representing my car) will turn on when the car is applying the brakes on its own. The system works pretty well, but seems best on a freeway. On an arterial street, where the speed limit is say 45, if there are no cars directly ahead of me, but there is a car a block ahead stopped at a stop light, it seems to take too long to lock on to the stopped car and approaches it too fast for my liking. In that case, I almost always put the brakes on manually before it decides to. Same thing off-ramps exiting a freeway. I have only once had the car put the brakes on in any emergency situation, saving me from potentially rear-ending a car in front of me. It generally beeps and displays a pop-up message well before it is going to put the brakes on by itself in a possible emergency situation. This is different from when it applies the brakes as part of the adaptive cruise control, where there are no messages. So I definitely like the ability of my car to put the brakes on by itself, if it decides it needs to.

What are the uses of embedded systems and machine intelligence in automobiles?

A high-end car today may have ,nearly 100 million lines of code, — several times more than a Boeing 787 Dreamliner — spread across 100 or more separate microcontrollers. Even a mainstream auto has probably 50 microcontrollers and 10 million lines of code. Some of these processors may be ARM-based with large memories, for example controlling the media center (what used to be the radio) and navigation, and possibly running Linux; while there are many more that are simple 8-bit devices with dedicated tasks such as operating the windshield washers or power windows, and not running an operating system at all. We just bought a new Subaru Impreza which has three separate LCD screens for the driver. It also has a system called ,Eyesight, which uses two cameras located on either side of the front mirror, and can pick up lane markings so that if I should start to wander outside of a lane, it will actually steer itself back into the middle. Plus it has front and rear collision avoidance systems, and adaptive cruise control (follows the car in front of me). So there is a lot of image processing going on here. In addition to cameras, some vehicles also use LIDAR (,Light Detection and Ranging,). Plus many cars are now connected to the Internet, so you would have wireless capabilities as well. And of course networking to tie all of this together. A common networking scheme using in autos is the CAN (,controller area network,) bus. Autonomous vehicles, which are already on the road, have a lot more of the above, plus mapping functions and probably voice recognition/response. This is all in addition to the computers that have been in cars for some time now to ,control engine-related functions, — timing, fuel mixture, etc.

Is Kia a good car brand? Would you buy it?

I had a Kia Rio for about 10 years — 2007 to 2017. I got rid of it only because I wanted a car with the latest safety features, such as adaptive cruise control, lane departure warning, and emergency braking. At the time I was shopping for a new car (November 2017), Kia didn’t make a Rio with those features. I think there was a Soul model that had them, but I didn’t like the boxy styling of the Soul, and I wasn’t interested in a larger car. So I ended up getting a Subaru Impreza with Eyesight technology (see ,Tom Crosley's answer to What are some of the better vehicles available for a person who drives 60 miles everyday, mostly freeway driving?,). It cost about twice as much as the Kia did 10 years earlier. Other than that, I think Kia makes some great cars. I never had any maintenance issues with mine, except when a fast-oil-change outfit wrecked the engine and it had to be replaced (see ,Tom Crosley's answer to What happens when I lose all my oil in my car at 70mph?,). But that wasn’t Kia’s fault.

What do you like and dislike about your Subaru?

We bought a new 2017 Subaru Impreza a little before Christmas. I use it for commuting to work and I love it. I had a 10-year-old Kia before, and I was interested in getting a car with all the new bells and whistles that were now available, so I did quite a bit of research beforehand and picked the Impreza as the best car under $30K which had the most new safety features. So I really am enjoying its ,Eyesight, technology. It uses two cameras mounted on either side of the front mirror: As a safety feature, both front and rear emergency braking are available. But what I really like is the adaptive cruise control — once I am on the freeway, I just turn it on and don’t have to put my foot on either the accelerator or brake pedal until I get off at my exit for work — it faithfully follows the car in front of me (if any), speeding up or slowing down (applying the brakes and slowing to a standstill in stop and go traffic if necessary). The feature works off the freeway as well for arterial roads. It has a screen that shows when it sees a car in front and is following it: It also has a lane assist feature, which will nudge the steering wheel a bit if you start to wander outside of your lane. My only complaint about all the new electronics is the Apple CarPlay feature of the entertainment system — it is supposed to sync up with my iPhone, but doesn’t always respond to the touch screen.

Which computer-based control system is more complex, the auto-pilot in a passenger jet or the one in a self-driving car or truck?

A high-end car today may have nearly a 100 million lines of code — ,according to this article,, 14 times more than a Boeing 787 Dreamliner (7 million) — spread across 100 or more separate microcontrollers. Even a mainstream auto has probably 50 microcontrollers and 10 million lines of code. At CES 2016, ,Ford announced, they have 150 million lines of code in their latest version of the F150. Those numbers, particularly for automobiles and trucks, include not just the auto-pilot features, but all the systems in the car such as engine control and entertainment centers. I’m not sure what’s all included in the 787 numbers. But still. Airplanes have had ,autopilots ,for many years. They are designed to keep the plane level, using an ,inertial guidance system,, and on course, based on the desired heading and either signals from the ground (in the past using ,LORAN-C,, now using satellite navigation such as ,GPS,). But they don’t have to worry about other vehicles or other obstacles directly ahead, behind, or beside them. Automobile ,autonomous driving systems, are actually more complex. They range from ,adaptive cruise control,, to ,lane-keeping assist,, all the way up to completely self-driving vehicles, such as ,Waymo self-driving taxis,, currently being tested in my area (near Phoenix, AZ). Autonomous vehicles use a combination of ,lidar,, radar, and cameras to make their way among traffic, and GPS for navigation. A year ago we bought a Subaru Impreza which has three separate LCD screens for the driver. It also has a system called ,Eyesight, which uses two cameras located on either side of the front mirror, and can pick up lane markings so that if I should start to wander outside of a lane, it will actually steer itself back into the middle. Plus it has front and rear collision avoidance systems, and adaptive cruise control (follows the car in front of me). So there is a lot of image processing going on here.

What are some of the better vehicles available for a person who drives 60 miles everyday, mostly freeway driving?

Whatever kind of vehicle you get, if you are going to be doing a lot of freeway driving, especially in traffic, I highly recommend you get one that has adaptive cruise control and emergency braking. We bought a new 2017 Subaru Impreza a little before Christmas. I use it for commuting to work and I love it. I had a 10-year-old Kia before, and I was interested in getting a car with all the new bells and whistles that were now available, so I did quite a bit of research beforehand and picked the Impreza as the best car under $30K which had the most new safety features. I really am enjoying its ,Eyesight, technology. It uses two cameras mounted on either side of the front mirror: As a safety feature, both front and rear emergency braking are available. But what I really like is the adaptive cruise control — once I am on the freeway, I just turn it on and don’t have to put my foot on either the accelerator or brake pedal until I get off at my exit for work — it faithfully follows the car in front of me (if any), speeding up or slowing down (applying the brakes and slowing to a standstill in stop and go traffic if necessary). The feature works off the freeway as well for arterial roads. It has a screen that shows when it sees a car in front and is following it: It also has a lane assist feature, which will nudge the steering wheel a bit if you start to wander outside of your lane. This is the next best thing to having a car that drives itself. Besides the Impreza, Subaru makes several other models that feature Eyesight technology, and there are quite a few other makes and models with similar features.

What are the uses if we introduce robotic technology into cars?

We bought a new 2017 Subaru Impreza a little before Christmas. I use it for commuting to work. I had a 10-year-old Kia before, and I was interested in getting a car with all the new bells and whistles that are now available, so I did quite a bit of research beforehand and picked the Impreza as the best car under $30K which had the most new safety features. The Impreza has what Subaru calls ,Eyesight, technology. It uses two cameras mounted on either side of the front mirror. So it even looks a bit robotic with its two “eyes”: With the two cameras spaced that far apart, it has potentially better depth perception than we humans do. It uses these for its adaptive speed control, lane departure warning and lane steering assist, and emergency front braking features. Not quite self-driving (it complains if I take my hands off the steering wheel for too long), but pretty close, at least on freeways and thoroughfares with lane markings. If I’m not paying attention, and let the car start to drift out of my lane, it will turn the steering wheel back for me to center the car within the lane. I can override that with some more force — for example if I meant to change lanes and forgot to turn on my turn signal. (If I use my turn signal properly, it doesn’t try to resist a lane change.) As a safety feature, both front and rear emergency braking are available. But the most useful feature is the adaptive cruise control — once I am on the freeway, I just turn it on and don’t have to put my foot on either the accelerator or brake pedal until I get off at my exit for work — it faithfully follows the car in front of me (if any), speeding up or slowing down (applying the brakes and slowing to a standstill in stop and go traffic if necessary and then starting up again). It has a screen that shows when it sees a car in front and is following it: The brake lights on the rear car in the diagram (representing my car) will turn on when the car is applying the brakes on its own. The system works pretty well, but seems best on a freeway. On an arterial street, where the speed limit is say 45, if there are no cars directly ahead of me, but there is a car a block ahead stopped at a stop light, it seems to take too long to lock on to the stopped car and approaches it too fast for my liking. In that case, I almost always put the brakes on manually before it decides to. Same thing off-ramps exiting a freeway. I have only once had the car put the brakes on in any emergency situation, saving me from potentially rear-ending a car in front of me. It generally beeps and displays a pop-up message well before it is going to put the brakes on by itself in a possible emergency situation. This is different from when it applies the brakes as part of the adaptive cruise control, where there are no messages. I use these “robotic” features as much as I can — even in city driving. I can’t wait to see what else is coming own the road, so to speak.

What are the oldest/cheapest cars or SUVs that have adaptive cruise control?

As of 2017 - 2017 Toyota Corolla L with standard TSS-P - $18500 2017 Honda Civic LX with optional Sensing package - $18740 + $1000 option 2017 Subaru Impreza Premium with optional Eyesight - $21195 + $2395 option Older/used cars may have adaptive cruise control, but as far as “cheapest” that varies since used car values varies based on mileage, year, condition, etc.. also you would have to find one with that option from the factory. I believe the 2003 Mercedes E Class was available with Distronic as an option, those are about $6–8k today? Good luck finding one with that option package however.

Do you leave your foot on the gas pedal or release once in a while?

About little over a year ago, we bought a 2017 Subaru Impreza. I use it for commuting to work and I love it. I had a 10-year-old Kia before, and I was interested in getting a car with all the new bells and whistles that were now available. So I really am enjoying its ,Eyesight, technology. It uses two cameras mounted on either side of the front mirror: As a safety feature, both front and rear emergency braking are available. But what I really like is the adaptive cruise control — once I am on the freeway, I set it at 75 and then don’t have to put my foot on either the accelerator or brake pedal until I get off at my exit for work — it faithfully follows the car in front of me (if any), speeding up or slowing down (applying the brakes and slowing to a standstill in stop and go traffic if necessary). (Speed limit is 65, but setting the control to 75 lets me keep up with traffic if it is going faster.) The feature works off the freeway as well for arterial roads. Once I exit the freeway, I lower the speed to 50 (by tapping a button down on the steering wheel five times — it is in 5 mph increments). If I come up to a red light and there are no cars ahead of me, I do have to put on the brakes manually. When the light turns green, I just tap the cruise control again to resume — no need to put my foot on the gas. So for the most part, during my commute I don’t have my foot on either the gas or brake pedal. All I have to do is steer — and if I am not paying enough attention to that, the lane assist feature puts me back in the middle of my lane.

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