Tag

paddle shift toyota yaris Related Articles

The Toyota Yaris Cross will get a Lexus BX twin, coming to Malaysia in 2023?

Just as the Toyota C-HR has spawned the Lexus UX, the Toyota Yaris Cross will also spawn yet another

New 2020 Honda BR-V facelift comes with paddle shifters, priced up RM 9k

facelift is now available for those looking for a more aggressive looking BR-V that even comes with paddle

Paddle shift in automatic cars, pretty useful or practically useless?

wikimedia.orgThe most primitive form of a paddle shift system was first seen in 1901, which was invented

TNGA-based Toyota Yaris SUV rumoured to launch tomorrow

The new Toyota Yaris-based SUV was initially scheduled for a debut at the 2020 Geneva International Motor

All-New 2020 Toyota Yaris debuts, now with swiveling seats and Volvo-level AEB

This is the all-new 2020 Toyota Yaris, revealed ahead of its world premiere at the Tokyo Motor Show later

2021 Toyota Yaris starts from RM70k, this or the City Hatchback?

The official prices of the 2021 Toyota Yaris are out and the prices are looking good.

Vietnam-bound Toyota Yaris Cross trademarked, 2021 launch possible?

in Vietnam, with the Toyota Yaris Cross being one of them.Judging from the trademark filings, the Toyota

Owner Review: A Car That I Can't Resist- My Story With My Toyota Yaris

** This article is the personal experience of a 2019 Toyota Yaris owner and does not necessarily reflect

The TNGA Toyota Yaris (and Yaris Cross) may not come to Malaysia. Here’s why

The recently-introduced TNGA-based Toyota Yaris Cross (and its Yaris hatchback sibling) has garnered

Leaked! Patent images of the Toyota Yaris facelift

Images of a black and white patent filing of a hatchback that looks like the Toyota Yaris has surfaced

View More

Honda Jazz Hybrid vs Honda Jazz V vs Toyota Yaris; combing through the spec sheet

We’ve compared the Honda Jazz and Toyota Yaris multiple times.

Facelifted 2021 Toyota Yaris teased - Toyota Safety Sense, December launch, from RM 71k

Now, Toyota has set off another ticking timebomb by teasing the facelifted 2021 Toyota Yaris.

CVT in the 2020 Toyota GR Yaris, wait...what?

Prior to the model going on sale in Japan, Toyota has announced the full line-up of the 2020 Toyota GR

Now Can Drive Toyota Yaris Hatchback Home For $18,705(RM 78,168)?

Toyotas pricing strategy for 2020 Yaris hatchbacks is very unusual. Why?

Ratings: 2019 Toyota Yaris 1.5G - High marks in comfort, 164/250 score overall

The 2019 Toyota Yaris has been dissected through the WapCar Ratings.

Review: 2019 Toyota Yaris – the best of both worlds in 1 interesting package

Yaris InteriorThe Toyota Yaris does not have the most stylish interior if compared to the likes of the

New 2021 Toyota Yaris Cross unveiled - TNGA-B, 1.5L NA & Hybrid

Toyota has just taken the covers off the new Yaris Cross, its latest B-segment SUV.The new Yaris Cross

2020 Toyota GR Yaris launched in Japan – Smaller, more special rival to the Civic Type R

Toyota has officially launched the totally bonkers GR Yaris hot hatch in Japan.

Leaked: Want this for your Ativa? Indonesia-spec Toyota Raize GR Sport gets paddle shifters!

Apart from getting both the Daihatsu Rocky and the Toyota Raize, Indonesians will also able to get a

How fuel efficient is the Toyota Yaris?

The 1.5-litre naturally aspirated heart of the 2019 Toyota Yaris is a familiar unit.

Ratings Comparison: 2019 Toyota Yaris vs 2018 Honda Jazz vs 2020 Mazda 2 Hatchback

3 / 5 3.5 / 5 4 / 5 Throttle Response 3.5 / 5 3.5 / 5 4 / 5 Transmission Shift

GR Yaris too expensive? Here's a cheaper, track-focused Toyota Yaris Cup Car

Over the past couple of weeks, the Toyota GR Yaris stole much of the Internet’s limelight and rightfully

2020 Toyota GR Yaris teased, Malaysia debut soon?

in the near future, as Toyota Malaysia recently posted a lone photo of the 2020 Toyota GR Yaris on their

Under pressure from Toyota Yaris, Japan-market Honda Jazz (Fit) to get new nose job

Historically, the Honda Jazz typically outsells the Toyota Vitz, as the Yaris was previously known as

New Toyota Yaris facelift launched in Thailand; ADAS, automatic LED Headlights

Behold the new 2020 Toyota Yaris facelift!

No Toyota Direct Shift CVT for the Perodua D55L, why?

It is used in Toyota models like the TNGA-B-based Toyota Yaris and Toyota Yaris Cross, as well as the

In Brief: Toyota Yaris 2019 - A Welcomed Rival

(Toyota Yaris 2019 Model | Gallery)The Toyota Yaris 2019 is a B-segment hatchback, aimed squarely at

Owner Review: Reasonable maintenance cost and low fuel consumption - My 2021 Toyota Yaris 1.5 E

Hence, after few considerations & options from many car brands, I decided to get Toyota Yaris 1.5E

Toyota pulls the plug on the Mazda 2-based Toyota Yaris in the US

Toyota has confirmed that the company will discontinue the Mazda 2-based Toyota Yaris in the US by this

Toyota GR Yaris could be launched in Malaysia soon, priced at about RM 1k for every 1 PS

Fresh from its world debut at the 2020 Tokyo Auto Salon, we have learned that the Toyota GR Yaris could

paddle shift toyota yaris Related Images

paddle shift toyota yaris Related Car Videos

  • Paddle Shift Toyota Yaris -paddle Shift Toyota Yaris-DTC Toyota C1404 Short Explanation

  • Paddle Shift Toyota Yaris-Toyota Yaris Sport 🔥 ¿El Mejor De Su Clase? 🔥 Prueba - Reseña

  • Paddle Shift Toyota Yaris-Take A Closer Look New Yaris 2018

  • Paddle Shift Toyota Yaris-WRC9 Toyota Yaris - New Zealand / PXN V9

  • Paddle Shift Toyota Yaris -paddle Shift Toyota Yaris-Toyota GR Yaris + Vios GR-S 赛道体验,不是普通的 Toyota !(小苠 VLOG)|automachi.com 马来西亚试车频道(中文字幕)

  • Paddle Shift Toyota Yaris -paddle Shift Toyota Yaris-New 2021 Toyota Vios GR Sport Is One Good Looking Sedan | Design & Interior

  • Paddle Shift Toyota Yaris-2021 Toyota Vios GR-S Review: Drive, Interior & Exterior

  • Paddle Shift Toyota Yaris-DTC Nissan C1727 Short Explanation

  • Paddle Shift Toyota Yaris-NEW 2021 TOYOTA RAV4 PRIME

  • Paddle Shift Toyota Yaris-2019 Toyota Corolla Hatchback XSE Test Driving Review And Features Explanation Ride Along

paddle shift toyota yaris Post Review

Driving the new Toyota Yaris Pulse for the next week. Loving the fact that this little hatch has an automatic gear box with paddle shift!

トヨタ。ラリー仕様のヤリスもといヴィッツ。Toyota. Yaris with Michelin, OZ Racing, Tein, OMP and no paddle shift. #tokyomotorshow

Tempted by this #Toyota #Yaris TR VVT-I petrol auto with Paddle Shift Option and Full Franchise History? Bid now: http://bit.ly/1myn6dY

2015 Toyota Yaris - €11,4501.33 LUNA MD MC 4DR95,327kmAutomatic transmission with paddle shift and reversing camera.Call us for more information or to arrange a test drive.094 9032 086 Cuffe Car Sales - supplying quality cars for over 55 years.http://cuffecarsales.com

Toyota Yaris Tr Vvt-I Automatic Paddle Shift Red (North London, Price: £1,900): Beautiful 2009 Toyota Yaris 1.3 ... http://bit.ly/eHO4KN

I liked a @YouTube video Toyota Yaris 2018 - The Most Detailed Review | Paddle Shift | Yaris VS Rivals | VX

“Paddle Shift” Fitur Baru Toyota Yaris Facelift yang Paling Dinantikan: via @YouTube

paddle shift toyota yaris Q&A Review

With Rs.10L to Rs. 12L, which sedan (preferably automatic) should I buy?

As your budget goes up to 12L, I will not suggest you compact sedans. I would recommend that you increase your budget a little to ,13L on road,. This will get you sufficiently equipped petrol ,mid size sedan with automatic transmission,. Your choice can be : Skoda Rapid 1.0 TSI Ambition AT: 12.97L Toyota Yaris G Optional CVT: 13.0L I have omitted the Maruti Ciaz due to its comparatively light build quality and very old and slow 4-speed autobox. The Automatic variants of Honda City and Hyundai Verna will cost you up to 14L. But in my opinion, the Rapid and Yaris will provide you most value for money. Here are the merits of each one. Skoda Rapid 1.0 TSI Ambition AT World renowned, and advanced 1.0 TSI ,Turbo Petrol engine, with 110 Hp and 175 Nm Quick shifting, smooth and reliable 6-speed Torque converter automatic Skoda’s good build quality with comprehensive 6 years warranty and service package Exterior Features: ,15 Inch Alloys, Projector Headlamps with LED DRLs, Front and Rear Foglamps, Rear Defogger, , Rear Parking Sensors, Electrically adjustable and foldable ORVMs Comfort Features,: Auto AC, 8 inch Android Touchscreen Music System, Steering mounted Audio Controls, Front and Rear Armrests, Rear AC vents, All Adjustable Headrests, 460L Boot space Some Unique Features:, Tilt and Telescopic Steering Adjustment, Auto Dimming IRVMs, One touch down on all Windows, Tinted Windows and Windscreen, Remote Controlled Power Windows Drawbacks:, Only 4 color options in Ambition Trim, Interiors though good quality may feel too bland and simple, Floor tunnel in rear seat is prominent and hampers leg space for middle 3rd passenger, Fuel efficiency marginally lower than manual Toyota Yaris G Optional CVT: 13.0L Toyota’s renowned solid build quality and very high reliability CVT is very smooth and jerk free, fuel efficiency higher than manual Exterior Features: ,Dual tone Color with Black Roof,, ,Diamond Cut, ,Alloys, Projector Headlamps, Front and Rear Foglamps, Rear Defogger , Rear Parking Sensors, Electrically adjustable and foldable ORVMs Comfort Features,: Push Button Start/Stop with Smart Entry, Auto AC, Steering mounted Audio Controls, Rear Armrest, All Adjustable Headrests, 476L Boot space Some Unique Features:, 7 Airbags (including side, knee and curtain), Steering Mounted Paddle Shifters, Roof Mounted Air Vent with Ambient Lights, 4.2 inch color MID display Drawbacks:, ,No Music System ,though has 4 speakers and steering controls(above image is of V Option), No Front Armrest, During sudden acceleration there is noticeable Lag in CVT due to Rubber band effect Both the cars have their own merits and demerits and you should test both extensively to gauge which one suits your needs the best. The fit finish levels are very good for both the cars and both feel premium. However, performance wise I would recommend the Rapid. But if you need very high reliability, Yaris must be the choice. Still,, if you wish, to go for the top end variant of a ,compact sedan,, ,Honda Amaze, is the best choice. You can have the highly fuel efficient VX CVT Diesel for 11.29L or the smooth and refined VX CVT Petrol for 9.80L.

I'm planning on buying a VW Polo (Petrol). The only thing stopping me is the high maintenance costs involved. Should this single reason stop me or do I go ahead and purchase the car?

VW overall has the best build. Especially it's VW Polo is known to be the safest in segment hatchback car. No.1 in safety- German Engineering undoubtedly. Design is Bland though! Since at VW They believe in simplicity. However, VW has the Best Automatic cars. It Uses most superior ‘7Speed DSG Gearbox’ whether it be VW Polo/Vento/Jetta/Passat or upcoming “T-Cross” suv to rival Creta. Rest carmakers use much inferior AGS/AMT/6Speed AT/AT+/iVT/CVT/DCT transmission in Automatics. So if it's the best automatic, especially in diesel... Then it's Volkswagen! No better driving cockpit & safety than VW. Looks wise, though best in that price bracket would be: 1. Honda Jazz/Amaze/City. 2. Hyundai i20/Verna. 3. Toyota Yaris/Etios Liva. 4. VW Polo/Ameo/Vento. WARNING: Volkswagen Servicing will cost you a bomb,! Compare this annual maintenance costs: Toyota Fortuner: र.2500/- (High end machine) VWPolo/Vento: र.15000/- (Basic car comparatively) Service network: VW is Poorest after Nissan. Even French carmakers Renault fares better. VW: has all core-essential features- ABS, ESP, EBD, HLA, paddle-shift, Best NCPA ratings. But VW will always miss many tiny but useful features like VW POLO has: No Smart-keys, No engine kill button, No Rear AC vents, No DRLs, No 6SRS Airbags (VW uses only dual airbags), No Rear wipers, No defoggers, No LED tail-lamps, No steering-mounted music controls, No rear parking camera(additional installation would cost 17k in VW Polo, even low end cars like Renault Kwid AMT 1.0L does come with preinstalled Rear parking camera), No touch screen infotainment systems preinstalled, No parking assist sensors, No remote opening trunk, No high-end music system like Harmon Kardon matching up its exotic price. [All this in regard to the most premium VW POLO GT TSI, a hatchback vehicle costing ,र.11,50,000/-, in Kerala,TN or states having RTO cost around 10%... Should be lesser in HP,Jharkhand,JK or other Union territories.] Imagine a hatchback like VW Polo, which is only a 1.2L engine with just 3 cylinders costing much more than Honda City VX MT, a full C-class sedan of 1.5L engine with 4 cylinders!!! Top end of the stable; VW Polo GT TSI still lacking so many features! it's Unacceptable!!!] And you may Google any VW dealerships and authorized service centres... irrespective they be of EVM, Muthoot, Popular, Pothens(Major dealerships in Kerala)... Have pathetic reviews and bad ratings... ,Volkswagen_India is most Un-German brand in India,..and Volkswagen dealerships in Kerala & India don't treat you the way Hyundai or Honda dealerships does. And any spare part would be quoted to be in import phase..so your vehicle staying in service centres would be agonisingly longgggg period, while you commute using other means..unless you have a second car. They neither do respond to your calls affirmatively ever. PS: maint cost is high and resale value is low. However VW engines have a very long life, unless you wanna change your vehicle after 15-18 yrs. if you're living in the city limits, do go for VW Polo...if you're in a tier-ll town... Depends please check your local VW Dealership's reviews & ratings. But If you're in neither of above two, it's ,“not recommended” ,since you may never find adequate service stations close by due to far flung services of VW as it doesn't have reach towards the fringes of our country, once in a blue moon visit to city just to service VW Polo might not be worth it and won't help the vehicle at least. I'd highly recommend that you go for Hyundai Santro, Honda Jazz/Brio, Ford Freestyle, Toyota Etios Liva/Cross or even Renault Kwid RXT. Would be anyday wiser to buy any other car than a Volkswagen Polo.

What are some difficulties that you experienced with a hybrid vehicle?

If I compare my Toyota Yaris Hybrid with its counterpart with conventional powertrain, the difficulties are almost nonexistant. The only real disadvantage (besides the slightly higher price) is a lower top speed. My Hybrid reaches slightly more than 100 mph, the non hybrid version reaches about 115 mph. There is one difficulty for people who love rushing along winding roads with a car with manual or tiptronic gearbox. When going with a manual car you might want to downshift before curves, this helps you to reduce your speed and keep the engine in high revs. And it appears to be more skilled driving than just stomping on the brakes if you want to slow down the car. But that's how you drive a Toyota Hybrid. You cannot shift up and down with a stick or with shift paddles. So you touch the brakes to decrease speed and touch the accelerator to speed up again. This is extremely simple, but it does not give you the feeling of being a skilled driver. Note: Like every automatic transmission, the Toyota Hybrid transmission has a setting for occasional extended downhill driving, it is called B and it prevents the car from becoming too fast. But it is not like shifting back one gear manually in order to make the car more responsive.

Why isn't the Toyota Yaris selling as much as its rivals in India even though it boasts segment-first features?

Yaris was tested in Indian roads for many years and released late in the crowded sedan segment market which was already dominated by city, verna and ciaz. Another big lackluster is absence of diesel engine. Recently I had a discussion with a Toyota sales person when I went to give my car for service. From them I understood that Indian car buyers prefer and like Toyota diesel engines more than the Toyota petrol engines. But trust me Toyota petrol engines also more reliable. My relative 2006 camry still run solid with 3 L km completed on it in UAE. Pricing is bit high. In Indian car market, pricing rules more than safety. So yaris scores less on that but personally I feel that pricing is fine as they offer 7 airbag in all variants which is not available in any of the global market for yaris. Recently I test drove the Yaris vx AT version. It was really a good car and manual mode and paddle shift is for driving enthusiastic but city ivtec is a gem on this. Imo, Yaris j at version is a vfm. Really yaris has Toyota reliability for sure. In present Indian car market, buyers preference is like diesel car means verna, petrol car means city, diesel AT means rapid. Budget is a constrain means ciaz. Yaris is difficult to fit on this for now. May be a diesel engine addition and right pricing may give a amount of selling.

What burns more gas, accelerating as fast as possible to 60 mph (e.g. 10 seconds) or accelerating slowly (e.g. 30 seconds)?

In addition to the many rightful answers saying that the best fuel economy is attained by accelerating at high engine load (near full throttle), but at low revs in order to be able to up-shift to higher gears as soon as possible, here are some graphs showing it. The above one is for a Toyota Yaris II D4D. The red lines show the way to obtain maximum acceleration, such as in racing or to clock the lowest possible time up to a given speed. The aim is to keep the engine as near as possible to its max power revs. Launch from rest is done at engine max torque by slipping the clutch — or the wheels if possible, but unlikely with this Yaris — up to about 16 km/h. Upshifts are performed around 4500 rpm — from 1st to 2nd at 40 km/h, 2nd to 3th at 74 km/h, etc. The green lines show how to accelerate frankly but in an fuel economical way, between 2/3 engine load and full engine load, aka 2/3 to full throttle. Up-shift to 2nd is done as soon as possible at about 16 km/h, and the engine is somewhat accelerated simultaneously along the vehicle throughout the gearshifts. (This is more important to save fuel on a loaded heavy truck with 12 or 16 gears because you don’t want to waste energy in letting the crankgear and flywheel slow down and re-accelerate it too much several times). Below is the BSFC map of a Mercedes 350 CGI. You want to stay in the green areas for the lowest specific fuel consumption and the sweet spot for this specific but typical gasoline engine is 235 g/kW.h between 1900 rpm and 2700 rpm at 75% load. If we accelerate slowly at very low engine load, the fuel consumption is in the red areas at more than 320 g/kW.h. And below is the BSFC map of a VW Golf VI 2.0 TDI. The hyperbolas of various colors are the iso-power lines. For example, if 40 hp (light blue line) are requested, they’ll be obtained with the best fuel efficiency between 1300 rpm and 1800 rpm at about 215 g/kW.h. Great fuel efficiency, but it might be somewhat altered now after the reprogramming due to the emissions scandal! Moe Incanto and Peter David Hill have posted the nice BSFC map for a 1.9 liter Saturn, also with iso-power hyperbolas. UPDATE: automatic transmissions The above is mostly for manual transmissions and I forgot to write about automatics. With them, accelerating frankly in “D” somewhere around 2/3 engine load until the desired speed is attained should provide a good fuel economy, with upshifts at reasonably low revs. They are programmed with an hysteresis delaying upshifts (and downshifts too) to avoid ceaseless up and down shifts when the conditions remain borderline. With older 3 and 4-ratios automatics, it was possible to elude that hysteresis by slightly releasing the accelerator to force an upshift and then pressing the throttle more again as soon as the upshift had been done. But with 6 or more ratios it becomes difficult because the transmission will then immediately downshift 1 or 2 ratios when the throttle is depressed a little more again. In principle, an automatic transmission should shift at the most appropriate time so that the consumption is minimal for the requested power. But in order to avoid incessant shifts when the vehicle speed and the engine load are close to the ideal point for this shift, hysteresis is essential. That is, the shifts are delayed from the optimal to obtain a crossover range. For example, in the above graph, if the vehicle is traveling at 90 km/h in 6th with 30% engine load (in the area under the bold purple line), a downshift from 6th to 5th will only occur if the throttle is depressed until the engine is loaded at least 80%. If its load exceeds 94%, a downshift in 4th will even take place. For a shift back to 6th, the load will have to be reduced below 43%. Note: ,Avoid the “S” (for “Sport”) program. It keeps the engine at higher revs and provides no advantages, only the drawbacks of increased fuel consumption and noise. If we need engine braking or if we want to drive very fast on a winding road, it’s better to shift manually using the paddle shifters or main shifter.

Why do some car enthusiasts loathe the Toyota Prius so much?

I think that the main reason for these feelings is that the Prius defines "driving skills" entirely different than enthusiasts do. Most car enthusiasts regard themselves being skilled in driving far above the average. The Prius does not challenge them on their field. You cannot drift it, powerslide it, you can't shift down in order to hit the apex of a curve perfectly. The car boils down the driving actions to the simplest things: Push the accelerator when you want to speed up, push the brake when you want to become slower. I drive a Toyota Yaris Hybrid since three months by now, and it has about the same drivetrain and the same driving characteristics as a Toyota Prius 2nd Gen.. Before that I had a Citroen with a so called SensoDrive gearbox - an automated manual transmission. This basically was a normal manual 5 speed gearbox with an automated shifting mechanism and an automated clutch. In terms of smoothness of ride, this SensoDrive was mediocre, to say the least, compared to that the Yaris Hybrid drives like silk. However, in the Citroen I had shift paddles, and I could override the automatic shifting. And so I frequently shifted back one or even two gears before driving around a corner. So I could decelerate and hold the revs of the engine up in order to have enough power to accelerate after the cornering. The Toyota does not allow this. It won't become any slower unless I push the brake pedal. This is something I still have to get familiar with, because I was educated not always to stomp on the brake. It feels like low quality driving when you stomp on the brake pedal instead of letting the engine do the braking, like skilled drivers do it. Of course I know that pushing the brake pedal not too hard activates the generator which generates electricity (and mildly decelerates the car) but I really would love to have a separate lever at the steering wheel which allows me to activate the regenerative braking without having to touch the brake pedal. Toyota advertises the Prius and other hybrid cars by their phantastic fuel economy. This triggers a special sort of buyers which become passionate about fuel saving. They develop and practise strange driving techniques like "Pulse and Glide". This means accelerating to a certain speed (not too harsh, have an eye on the eco-meter) and then let the car roll. This gives mileages up to 65 mpg, but it drives everybody around you nuts. And many car enthusiasts do not have a high opinion about people who drive strangely just to save a fraction of a gallon fuel. Actually, I find my car very relaxing. Just accelerate to 75 mph, set the cruise control and wait to arrive. If I really want adrenalin, I take my motorcycle. It burns more gas than my car - isn't that crazy?

What is a paddle shift in automatic cars?

Paddle shift are just 2 paddles on steering wheel which helps to change gear manually when you want in automatic transmission cars one paddle is of + sign means up shift and other is of - sign which means down shift It provide you a fun to drive experience if you are driving lover companies offer this feature with some med range cars such as Honda city petrol CVT Toyota yaris CVT, Rhonda jazz and also New Honda Amaze 2018 which is the cheapest car with Paddle shift available and in this car paddle shift also available with diesel engine also Image Source :- Google

Can I get a fully-automatic car to upshift earlier? I was driving a Toyota Yaris (automatic) & it kept revving high long before changing gear. It was a pain accelerating to 100kph from stops. How do I upshift quicker (I’m usually used to manuals)?

I wrote the following in my ,answer to What burns more gas, accelerating as fast as possible to 60 mph (e.g. 10 seconds) or accelerating slowly (e.g. 30 seconds)?, (check it, there also a graph for a Toyota Yaris II D4D - but manual) With automatics, accelerating frankly in “D” somewhere around 2/3 engine load until the desired speed is attained should provide a good fuel economy, with upshifts at reasonably low revs. They are programmed with an hysteresis delaying upshifts (and downshifts too) to avoid ceaseless up and down shifts when the conditions remain borderline. With older 3 and 4-ratios automatics, it was possible to elude that hysteresis by slightly releasing the accelerator to force an upshift and then pressing the throttle more again as soon as the upshift had been done. But with 6 or more ratios it becomes difficult because the transmission will then immediately downshift 1 or 2 ratios when the throttle is depressed a little more. Diagram of upshifts and downshifts lines according to car speed and engine load In principle, an automatic transmission should shift at the most appropriate time so that fuel consumption is minimal for the requested power. But in order to avoid incessant shifts when the vehicle speed and the engine load are close to the ideal point for this shift, hysteresis is essential. That is, the shifts are delayed from the optimal to obtain a crossover range. For example, in the above graph, if the vehicle is traveling at 90 km/h in 6th with 30% engine load (in the area under the bold purple line), a downshift from 6th to 5th will only occur if the throttle is depressed until the engine is loaded at least 80%. If its load exceeds 94%, a downshift in 4th will even take place. For a shift back to 6th, the load will have to be reduced below 43%. Note: ,Avoid the “S” (for “Sport”) program. It keeps the engine at higher revs and provides no advantages, only the drawbacks of increased fuel consumption and noise. If we need engine braking or if we want to drive very fast on a winding road, it’s better to shift manually using the paddle shifters or main shifter.

HOME