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touch up paint kawasaki Q&A Review

Toro 20018 SN 22033426, drained gas, changed oil, new fuel line, new carb, and fresh gas. It will start, but doesn't rev very high, and slowly just dies over 10 seconds. I've adjusted the carburetor screw to about every position. Why won't it run?

A lot of good points to check. It sounds like you had bad gas in the tamk, and it has contaminated your new parts. It starts, so the carb is at least partially working and should be able to sustain operation at some level. The key is how it dies - gradually. It is running out of gas. If it will run properly for several minutes with a half tank of fuel, then dies out, that cap vent is plugged. Fuel is getting into the carb or it couldn’t do anything. The bowl should provide fuel for three primer squirts and a little bit of run time with fading power. If it starts and immediately fades, the main jet isn’t getting fuel, and the performance is simply the primer charge. Try less prime (2 or even 1 squirt). If it starts, levels out for several seconds, then fades out, fuel isn’t getting into the bowl quick enough. The fuel tank screen could be blocked, but don’t poke it. It wasn’t as important in the old (real gasoline) days, but with ethanol blended fuels, you really need it. The tank accumilates tiny translucent bits/blobs of garbage generated by moisture and modern, unstable fuel, that sits anywhere for long (a month, or even less). That is why fuel stabilizer is such a big deal these days. Much of it will pass through the carb unnoticed, and some will not. Small engine carbs don’t have high pressure injection pumps to force it through, they just block up. If you clean out ,everything, the fuel touches, and run the residue through a fine mesh paint filter, you may find the culprit. I disassembled a very clean carb on a 26hp Kawasaki powered rider that only ran on the idle fuel circuit - idled fine, but died when the opened up. It was a few little bits smaller than the head of a pin that slowed the fuel flow - just keep cleaning until everything passage squirts nicely with the WD-40, let it drain out, and it should work. Put that idle screw back to spec before starting it. Unless damaged, the float should be set right; if not, it could cause the same symptoms.

Where can I sell my digital artwork easily online?

17 great places to sell your design onlin As a creative type, you could sell your design work online to make more money this year. Whether you're an art director, illustrator or 3D artist, there's a market for high-quality designs and different ways you can sell sell directly to the public. It's now simpler than ever to sell online, be it books, prints, T-shirts, 3D assets or other products. 01. Creative Market Popular site Creative Market is a brilliant place to sell your fonts, graphics, print templates and other designs online A favourite among designers, Creative Market is a brilliant place to sell your designs online. Whatever it is you're creating – graphics, fonts, photos, even 3D assets – get it online at Creative Market and it'll be in front of five million members. There's no exclusivity lock-in, you set your own prices and take home 70 per cent of each sale. Open a Creative Market shop here. 02. TurboSquid There's a growing market for well-made 3D assets (Image credit: TurboSquid) If you want to sell 3D assets, you can't go wrong with TurboSquid. It's been selling 3D models for almost two decades, to be used across a host of different industries and mediums, including filmmaking, video games and architecture. Featuring categories from cars to animals, architecture to anatomy and everything in between, you can put your 3D skills to good use. With stock models becoming a more prevalent way of creating 3D content, there's a growing market for well-made assets – and you can get involved by selling on TurboSquid. If you need new tools, here's our pick of the best 3D modelling software around. For advice on selling 3D models, see our guide on how to sell your 3D assets online. 03. Design Cuts Design Cuts was set up by designers, offering quality assets Design Cuts is a community website offering high quality assets to designers at affordable and discounted prices. Patterns, brushes, backgrounds, fonts, graphics and other slick assets abound. "We're very exclusive and work with only the best designers in the world, curating the highest quality marketplace around," it told us. To be featured on the site, Design Cuts says to get in touch via its Contact page. 04. Art Web Art Web offers options to sell paintings, illustrations, digital art, prints, designs and more (Image credit: Art Web) Art Web is an ecommerce site that specialises in selling art online to buyers around the world. A community of different artists and creatives use this online platform to network and share their work, as well as to make money from it. The service works on a no-commission basis, and there's a free plan that gives you an online gallery with up to 15 images. There's also a paid-for version that gives you more images and a professional-looking website. Sell your art with Art Web here. 05. Big Cartel Create and customise your own store on Big Cartel's website (Image credit: Big Cartel) Launched in 2004, Big Cartel is one of the most popular platforms for any creative looking to sell design work online. Unlike a lot of websites, it allows you to build your store and customise it to give it a unique feel as well as it adapting to your existing website. Giving you all the professional tools you need to conduct market research – such as a tracking and social networking – you're given total freedom and control over the ways in which you choose to sell and promote your work. The price plan ranges from free to $29.99 a month depending on the support and facilities you wish to use, as well as the number of products you are offering. Sign up for a Big Cartel store here. 06. This is a Limited Edition This is a Limited Edition has a rigorous vetting process for its artists (Image credit: Limited Edition) This is a Limited Edition, formerly Click for Art, specialises in art prints, canvas prints and limited edition products from cushions to mugs and laptop cases. It features work from tops artists including Jon Burgerman, Audrey Kawasaki and Mode 2. If you're a talented artist, this could be a great avenue to sell your designs to a commercial audience. Fill out its Artist Application to be considered. 07. Artist Shops Open an artist shop for free at Threadless (Image credit: Artist Shops) Artist Shops is run by online community and ecommerce store Threadless, and provides artists with a customisable storefront, and the benefits of a hosting and checkout experience through Threadless. You can choose various products to sell your art on, and there's no minimum order size. Sign up to Artist Shops here. 08. Society 6 Society 6 takes care of the manufacturing and logistics for you (Image credit: Society 6) Society 6 is another online platform for creatives to sell design work, focusing on "affordable art prints, iPhone cases and T-shirts". It's free to set up, and the products are produced made, shipped, and managed for you – leaving you with only the designing to do. With the site only taking a small percentage of what you sell back, this is a great place for designers and creatives looking to get their work featured onto a vast range of products. Find out how to sell on Society 6 here. 09. Etsy Etsy has the feel of a giant online craft fair Etsy is a global ecommerce website that caters for the needs of creatives looking to sell design work, focusing on handmade goods, vintage items and art and craft supplies. Essentially, it's an online version of a massive craft fair. Etsy is the most popular of craft-driven retail sites, and offers the kind of million-strong global audience most creatives would struggle to reach on their own. The site is open to all sellers, and it's relatively cheap to use: listing an item for four months (or until it sells), costs $0.20 (around 13p), and commission fees sit at 5 per cent (plus VAT) on each purchase. There are some downsides, though: with this popularity comes stiff competition, quality control is essentially non-existent, and keeping on top of updates can be time-consuming. Open an Etsy shop here. 10. Zazzle Sell your designs on hundreds of products with Zazzle (Image credit: Zazzle) Zazzle is an online marketplace that lets you sell your designs on hundreds of products. It's free and easy to create an online store on Zazzle, and its powerful tools make it possible to sell your art on T-shirts, stamps, posters, mugs, business cards, skateboards, calendars, tote bags, hats, and more. Sell your designs with Zazzle here. 11. Redbubble You can set up your own profit margin rate on Redbubble On Redbubble you can set your own profit margin for all product types – avoiding any dodgy percentage cuts. It also has an array of artist groups that host challenges to inspire your creativity. It's free to join, with the site sending you your earnings every month. Find out more about selling on Redbubble here. 12. INPRNT There's a three-part process to setting up your artworks on INPRNT INPRNT is a moderated gallery with a submission process. First, sign up for an INPRNT account and submit three of your best pieces for review. That submission is then voted on by artists already on the site. Once the submission is approved, the new member's account is automatically upgraded to an artist account and you can upload work to your gallery for sale straight through the site. Apply for an INPRNT site here. 13. Not on the High Street This online store gets over 39 million unique users annually It costs £199 to join Not On The High Street, and sellers have to pay 25 per cent commission, plus VAT (Etsy, by comparison, only charges 5 per cent). However, the site pulls in over two million unique visitors per month, which doubles at Christmas, so for many it's worth the investment. NOTHS focuses on quality rather than quantity. It's more exclusive than competitors like Etsy, with strict guidelines and a tough application process. The result is only the best designer-makers can secure a spot on the site. Find out more about selling on NOTHS here. 14. Design By Humans Illustrators rejoice! There's a huge marketplace of illustrated wares here Design By Humans is an online store offering T-shirts, phone cases, prints, mugs and more with designs from over 15,000 global designers. Describing itself as a "community" of passionate artists and customers, you upload your designs and the site handles the logistics of payments, printing items, shipping orders and so on. You can even opt for a custom storefront. Sign up for a Design By Humans store here. 15. MyFonts Sell your fonts with MyFonts MyFonts is one of our go-to sources of new and exciting fonts here at CreativeBloq, and you can be featured on it. Your type designs could reach a broader (paying) audience by being featured in one of the site's bundles, as well as its collections filtered by descriptive keywords. Find out how to sell your typefaces through MyFonts here. 16. Your own website It might be worth building your own website While established platforms offer ready-made audiences and low barriers to entry, if you've established a solid customer base, it might be worth building your own bespoke web shop, where you won't have to shell out listing fees or commission. Ecommerce plugins make this even more accessible. Shopify comes highly recommended, offering simple inventory management features, customisable web URLs and a a beautiful selection of website themes to get you started. Also check our post on inspiring ecommerce website designs. 17. Pop-up shops and craft fairs Preparation is key when it comes to hosting your own pop-up shop Okay, so this one isn't online, but it's worth considering. A temporary physical space is one relatively low-risk way to expands your customer base and gain some insights into who what sells and why. Being able to speak to people face-to-face is also a good way to cement your brand in their memory – even if they just walk away with business card the first time. Renting a space with a friend or collaborator can help bring down costs, and it’s easy to do it on a budget with a bit of effort and imagination.

What kind of car does M.S. Dhoni drive?

Mahendra Singh Dhoni, the former Indian cricket team captain, is not only famous for his exemplary performance in the sport, but also well known for his wide range of cars and motorcycles collection. Some examples of the cars and motorcycles owned by him are the Ferrari 599 GTO, the Yamaha RD350 and more, not to mention his knowledge of the machines parked in his garage Cars owned by MS Dhoni: Images are for representational purpose only Mahendra Singh Dhoni has quit his captaincy of the Indian cricket team, but he will still be loved and respected by its fans across the world for his proficiency in the sport. While everyone is praising his brilliant accolades in the world of cricket, we explore his collection of cars and motorcycles. Audi Q7 Audi Q7: Image is for representation purpose only Audi Q7 is one the most popular SUVs with the celebrities in India like Arshad Warsi, Bipasha Basu, ,Deepika Padukone,, Emraan Hashmi, John Abraham and many others. Some sportspersons also love this behemoth, one of them being MS Dhoni. Dhoni who owns the previous generation Audi Q7 30 TDI Quattro in black colour. It is powered by a 2,967 cc diesel engine that produces around 242 hp of power and 550 Nm of torque. The Audi Q7 is a premium SUV in the company’s product lineup and it is one of the favourite cars in his garage. Hummer H2 Audi Q7: Image is for representation purpose only The second SUV owned by the former captain is the 2009 Hummer H2 which is also a black colour SUV. He has been spotted several times driving his H2 in Ranchi, his hometown. In fact, he awestruck the New Zealand cricket team when the match was held in Ranchi (2016 ODI Series) and instead of taking the official crew bus, Dhoni took this big brute. Mitsubishi, Pajero SFX and Outlander Mitsubishi Pajero SFX: Image is for representation purpose only Although, Mitsubishi has discontinued the Pajero SFX from its India model lineup, MS Dhoni still owns one. The Pajero is the third SUV owned by MS Dhoni and is a capable off-roader which is powered by a 2.8 litre turbocharged diesel engine producing 120 hp of power and 280 Nm of torque. Another Mitsubishi model which the cricket legend owns is the Outlander which is available only in a petrol engine. The Outlander uses a 2.4 litre MIVEC, naturally aspirated petrol engine that develops 170 hp and 226 Nm. Mahindra Scorpio Mahindra Scorpio Adventure Edition: Image is for representation purpose only Not only Mahi, but the then Chief Minister of Gujarat and now the Prime Minister of India, ,Narendra Modi, was fond of the Mahindra Scorpio. The Mahindra Scorpio is one of the most popular SUVs in the country. The Scorpio owned by Dhoni is an open top modified version which has been specially customised for him. His Scorpio is a four-seater version that also has a roll cage. Land Rover, Freelander 2 Land Rover Freelander 2: Image is for representation purpose only The last in the list of SUVs owned by MS Dhoni is the Land Rover Freelander 2. The Land Rover Freelander 2 is also in black colour which is powered by a 2.2 litre turbo diesel engine. This engine has two states of tune and generates 148 hp of power and 187 hp of power, torque remaining the same at 420 Nm. Although, this model has been replaced by the ,Land Rover Discovery Sport,, it is one of the most popular models that was sold in India. Ferrari 599 GTO Ferrari 599 GTO: Image is for representation purpose only The cricketer also owns a Ferrari 599 GTO with an Indian tricolour painted on the bonnet of the supercar. Under the hood, the Ferrari 599 GTO is powered by a 6.0 litre V12 naturally aspirated petrol engine that generates 661 hp of power and 620 Nm of torque. Along with cars, MS Dhoni is also known for its bike collection. He currently owns 22 motorcycles in his garage. Here is the list of few motorcycle MS Dhoni owns Confederate Hellcat X132 Confederate Hellcat: Image is for representation purpose only This is the most expensive motorcycle in the Dhoni’s garage. The Confederate Hellcat X132 is powered by a 2.2 litre engine that produces 132 hp of power. MS Dhoni is the only south-east Asian who owns this and there were only 150 units that have been produced. Kawasaki Ninja H2 Kawasaki Ninja H2: Image is for representation purpose only Another superbike MS Dhoni owns is the Kawasaki Ninja H2, which was launched in India at a price of Rs 29 lakh, ex-showroom, Delhi. It is powered by a 998 cc 4 cylinder supercharged petrol engine that produces 200 hp of power and torque at 134 Nm. The motorcycle can touch a top speed up to 400kmph Yamaha RD350, This is Dhoni’s first motorcycle, the RD350, which he bought only for Rs 4500. The cricketer tweeted the picture of the motorcycle in 2013. The RD350 was the first motorcycle built in India which is still popular with motorcycle enthusiasts. Kawasaki Ninja ZX-14R Kawasaki ZX-14R: Image is for representation purpose only Another noteworthy mention in his collection of motorcycles is the Kawasaki ZX-14R, one of the fastest production motorcycles in the world. It is powered by a 1,441 cc engine that produces the 197.39 hp of power. The ZX-14R MS Dhoni owns is in black and is priced at Rs 17 lakh. Harley Davidson Fatboy Harley-Davidson Fatboy: Image is for representation purpose only This cruiser motorcycle is one of MS Dhoni’s favourites. It is powered by a 1,690 cc air cooled V-Twin engine that produces 61 hp of power and 132 Nm of torque. Yamaha Thundercat Yamaha Thundercat: Image is for representation purpose only Yamaha Thundercat or YZF600R was manufactured by Yamaha from 1996 to 2007. The sportsbike is powered by a 600 cc engine that produces 100 hp of power and 66 Nm of torque. source - express drive

How expensive would motorcycle racing as a hobby be as a beginner, proficient, and at an elite level? Including buying and maintaining level-appropriate sport bike, fees for using the tracks, a coach(?) etc, with a full time job and no sponsorship?

Hello! Obviously there can be quite a range depending on the class(es) you want to run, the club you are in, how many races they run in a season, how many tracks they participate at (travel costs), just how competitive you want to be, etc etc. But let’s give you someplace to start. First, your upfront costs. you of course need a bike. Let’s pick the most popular class, 600 production class, as that is the one I participated in most of my time racing, and is very popular. To be the most competitive means you really must have the most recent generation of the big 4’s (Honda, Yamaha, Suzuki, Kawasaki) “raciest” 600 class bike (some offer multiple 600s). For example that could mean a Honda CBR600RR, the new 2020 model going for $11,799 plus $380 destination charge MSRP according to the Honda website. You can save a bit if you get a slightly older model year bike, possible used, if the manufacturer hasn’t done any major upgrades to their newer model years since then. And also, of course, the big 4 swap who has the fastest bike from time to time, but they are usually fairly close. Though every once in a while one company makes a huge leap forward, such as when I was racing in the 90s and the CBR600-F2 came out. If you didn’t have that bike, you really didn’t have a chance. So, you may be forced to get a certain brand if that is the case. (sorry can’t tell you what one that may be nowadays!) Next, for basic gear you must have, you need riding gear. That means leathers, helmet, boots, gloves, and spine protector. Looks like even the cheapest leather suits from Dainese (a common brand) runs about $1000. Spending more gets you more comfort, more protection, and of course, fancier looks. How much any of those mean to you may increase your costs. Helmets also vary greatly, but the most basic requirements are that it is full face (of course) and is the latest SNELL approval rating. Another common brand is Shoei. Looks like even their cheapest models run around $399. And yes, you can find much cheaper helmets from other manufacturers, various off brands, etc. But, you often get what you pay for in quality of construction, comfort, etc. Buyer beware, it is your skull in there! I would stick with the established brands. Then you have boots. Looks like Alpinestars (yet another common brand) is selling their cheapest boots for the $270ish range. Again, more money, more protection, comfort, and looks. Especially if you want your boots to match your leathers… You can do it cheap. The rules generally say “leather boots that cover the ankle”. That could even mean old army combat boots (which is exactly what I started racing in!) but since they didn’t have the nifty plastic skid pads on the ankles and toes, I rapidly wore holes in them when my feet touched ground around the corners, and were totally destroyed after my first wreck. Next is gloves. Again, back to Alpinestars for an example. looks like the cheapest they have is around the $100 range. They look like ones in this range aren’t very long, and just barely cover the wrist. That can be bad, as your wrist is one of the places that tend to get ground up when sliding along the asphalt. I would suggest paying the extra $50 for the extra leather. and whatever you do, don’t get ones with metal studs in the palms! You may think they would help longevity of the gloves sliding along the ground, but in reality, they tend to rip out of the leather leaving holes, and even if they don’t, they act as exceptional conduits to transfer heat to your palms! I’ve seen a number of riders come back with little circles branded into their palms. No fun. As a matter of fact, pick gloves with as much padding (Kevlar) on your palms as you can get, and make sure that padding covers the WHOLE palm, not just the outside edge or the like. I can attest to the fact of how hot your hands can get sliding along the pavement at 150mph, and it will wear through and char thin leather really quick! Get thick gloves… Finally, a spine protector. As always, you get what you pay for. a basic small one with be around $50, and they get more spendy as they get bigger, more padding, more plastic plates, cove more area and sides, etc. I would suggest get one at least with plastic plates along the spine, as I have worn through leathers sliding on my back, and if I didn’t have the plastic plates there, I’m sure just a foam pad wouldn’t have lasted much beyond the leathers. losing flesh always hurts, plus the plastic plates really help with dissipating impacts. So, now you have your riding gear, and also you have a bike. Now you need to get that bike ready to race. This is where things can get expensive in a hurry. Overall, the theory of the production class is to keep costs down by limiting what all you can do to enhance your bike. And, different organizations put different limits on what can and can’t be done. Your 1st step of course is to get a rulebook for the organization you intend to race with, so you know what those rules are. Then you can make informed decisions as to what you do to the bike so you comply with those rules. It would suck to dump money into a mod, just to find out it is illegal, or have your hard won victory pulled from you and forever be known as a cheater if you get caught. So, let’s talk about some modifications. First, the must-haves First, is tires. Don’t skimp on tires. Like bikes, the big manufacturers offer their “raciest” models and compounds of production class racing tires. And, some years some manufacturers figure something out and offer better products than others. Go to the track, ask around, see what everyone (fast) is running. What you don’t do though, tempting as it is, is to buy race takeoffs. Those used race tires may look like a good deal, with lots of tread left (in the center) even, but trust me, they are toast. They have been heat cycled out. That blue sheen you see on them is the sign of your impending doom. The oils have been pulled out of the rubber from the heat of racing, probably multiple sessions, where they have been heated and cooled, and heated and cooled again and again, which has made the rubber harden, and become slick, even when you get them up to temp. Trust me, from experience, they will turn on you… So, expect to pay For a set of good tires probably around $350-400 for the set plus mount/balance. Next is brakes. You need good brake pads. And, it is an expendable you will go through a lot of. Look for racing compounds, and again, see what racers are running. When I first started, I thought it would be cool to get a brand (Forodo) that no one was really running, and after the first time they got wet, I suddenly realized why. Stick with what works, and again, don’t go cheap. Brake fade at the end of the front straight half way through a race is a terrifying experience. Stick with the stock disks, they will last forever (as long as you never let your pads go metal on metal), and are well made. A very common upgrade is steel braided brake lines. Back in my day they were probably more beneficial, but nowadays at the standards the stock lines are at, it may not be necessary. For now, stick with just the pads. EBC Sintered are a good start at about $80 for the front 2 sets. And no, you will never need to replace your rear brake pads. You will hardly ever use the thing. Another must is most likely a re-gear for your intended track. At my old haunt (Portland International Raceway) you were pretty good with just changing the front sprocket to one tooth smaller. Talk to the local racers to see what they are doing. If you intend to run multiple tracks, you may need more options, and if you need to fine tune by changing the size of the larger rear sprocket (changing one tooth on the front is a big jump, taking multiple teeth on the back to make the same change) or change more than one tooth overall, you are going to run into more cost, as the rear sprocket is more expensive, and more than 1 tooth change will likely also mean a new chain. Speaking of chains, here is another place you don’t want to skimp. It makes for a horrible day when you break a chain and the end swings around and takes a chunk out of your engine casing, or worse, wraps itself around your rear wheel causing you to be launched off you bike high-sided derriere over teakettle to soon after go splat on hard hard pavement. Another common “upgrade” is to run smaller width chain/sprocket sets. (520 vs 530). The idea is thinner, less rolling resistance, less mass, go faster. This may be, but also means things wear out faster. And, with a high horsepower bike, less margin for error between when something is just worn out and when it fails. $30–200 depending. Another very common upgrade is exhaust. Usually, the stock exhaust is big, heavy (it needs to be very quiet to meet DOT regs), usually all one piece, hence not easily repairable, etc. It also may be tuned for a wider power band than may be desirable for a racing application. An aftermarket unit on the other hand most likely doesn’t care (much) about how loud it is, is tuned for peak performance, is lighter, and is usually assembled in (at least) 3 sections- the header assembly, the collector pipe, and the canister. Usually if you wreck on the exhaust side, the canister pays the price. It is nice to be able to buy, (or even better re-skin and repair if the end caps are good) a new one. They often can also be repacked if the sound dampening material burns up (which it will over time). If you really tweak it, you may have to replace the collector pipe too, but at least you usually don’t have to replace the whole (expensive) unit. As always, ask around though, some brands are really good (and usually cost), and some just make you “loud and last”. Just getting what is known as a “slip on”, which is usually just replacing the collector and canister, gives you the benefit of it being aftermarket (see above), but you lose the advantage of that tuned for max performance header assembly, which is often where your big horsepower gains come from. $500–1000+ for a full system, cheaper for a slip-on. Re-jet (carbureted bike) or remap (fuel injected) bike. The idea is to get the bike running to full potential, and not restricted by DEQ requirements. Racers don’t care about no stinking environment! Well, at least not while actually racing… Next is bodywork. It is possible to run with stock bodywork, and many (including me) have. But, it is heavier, and usually has no place to put your number stickers due to the headlight holes, and the passenger rear seat. You could drill and mount number plates, but they are ugly, stick out in the wind like fins, and now you have holes in your nice stock bodywork. Further, often on various bikes you will touch your lower fairing down at extreme lean angles, others will bump into you, the bike will fall off its wheel stand in the pits, or otherwise you will destroy that beautiful stock bodywork. If you still intend to ride your bike on the street between race days (I did for years, it was my only means of transportation) keep that stock bodywork for that. Otherwise, sell it. It is worth far more than the aftermarket fiberglass race bodywork you will buy (don’t get the ABS stuff, it is junk). It looks like sets will run you between $600-$900+(plus paint). It is worth it, it can be repaired with fiberglass repair kits, and individual parts can be had cheaper. If you are really innovative, (like me!), you buy your 1st set, make a mold of it, then make your own sets as needed for about 3 days of (very smelly messy) labor and about $100 in materials. Trust me, be at this very long, and you’ll need em. So, if you have all of the above, plus do all the things like the rules require, like safety wiring your hose clamps, your axles, your brake banjo bolts and mounting bolts, your oil filter, drain your coolant and run straight water (with redline water wetter for anti corrosion), tape off your dash, and any lenses you left on the bike (take them all off), along with removing your mirrors, etc. you are ready to go with the bare minimum you can probably get away with! But, of course there are the other things I’m about to list, that are of varying necessity, some of which you can probably not really live without. So, speaking of livability, Here goes. Wheel stands. it sucks having to find a tree, a garbage can, or an unsuspecting friend (they usually only fall for it once, and if a bad friend, bad things happen to your beautiful bodywork) to hold up your bike the whole time you are off of it. Don’t forget, you have to remove your kickstand to get through tech inspection. Tools- things break, come loose, need to be adjusted, or even just hammered on. Tools make all this possible. Tools are expensive, you will need lots, and then you need the tool box to get them there. And, they are heavy, so that box better have wheels… A Truck, or a trailer if you don’t own a truck. ( a cargo van works too). You gotta be able to get your beast to the track. And no, riding it there and stripping it down and getting it race ready on race day before the first race isn’t an option. Where are you going to carry your wheel stand, over your shoulder? Don’t forget ramps to get it into your Trailer/Truck/Van, and also tie down straps! An awning. Oh yes, you will definitely want one of those! Sit out in the hot sun in the pits (which is most likely hot asphalt) trying to pull everything apart to figure out why it is stuttering under acceleration all of a sudden, and see how well you like it with that hot hot sun beating down on you, hour after hour. Makes you uncomfortable just thinking about it, doesn’t it. Lawn chairs. Standing all weekend sucks. Sitting on that boiling hot pavement is not an option. Neither is sitting on your friends. Gas cans- A bike racing gets about 20 miles per gallon if you are lucky. 2 miles a lap. 20 minute warm up session, 4 lap qualifier, 10 lap race, per class you are running in, plus (hopefully) a full practice day on Saturday. it is amazing how much gas you go through. And, if you want to get some buddies and run that 6 hour endurance race, you are burning up about 5 gallons per hour. Better have a 55 gallon drum! Camping gear- you will be spending the night if there is a practice day beforehand. Food/Drink- the snack shack food (if offered) is horrendously expensive, and the selection is lacking. And now there is the stuff that is may not strictly be required, but will make you more competitive and your life generally easier. Spares- you will need spares, lots and lots of spares. Have a wide array of foot pegs, foot peg brackets, brake levers, handlebars (with switch and lever assemblies), brake reservoirs, radiator, front fairing bracket, gas tank, spare set of bodywork, spare engine case end caps, lots of nuts and bolts, tires, wheels, forks, triple clamps, rear swing arm, rear sub frame, throttle and clutch cables, handle bar grips, clutch pack, chain, brakes, and on and on. In essence, a full spare bike, with multiples of the commonly broken stuff like handlebars, foot pegs, foot peg brackets, and brake and clutch levers. Seriously, the thing to do is look for a wrecked bike (or 3) to buy for its parts. Scrounge ebay, set up alerts if parts become available. Buy cheap, and see if they will give discounts if you buy the whole lot. Towards the end, our team was running 6 riders and 4 bikes. we went through a crazy amount of stuff. And nothing sucks worse than pulling wheelies in the warm up area to show off to the cute girls just to dump your ride and not have that spare part you now need to continue your weekend, forcing you to slink away home in shame. Suspension upgrades. Maybe not quite as necessary now, with these new bikes, but depending on your weight, you may need to re-spring/ re-valve the front suspension. you may also need to look at replacing the rear suspension. And, get someone to set it up right, and teach you what they are doing and why. Pay attention! Know what it means when you start getting tank slapper death wobble driving hard out of the corners (probably rear compression and or spring too soft) or that nasty front end chatter coming into a corner. A good handling bike is a godsend, and will dramatically up your confidence (and lower your lap times). Motor upgrades- i intentionally put this last. This is really not where to invest your money. Depending on your organization, there may be many upgrades you can do and still stay legal in the production class. Some of these may include boring the engine .010 over, or shaving the head .010 (for maintenance of course!), changing engine timing, balancing/blueprinting, full radius valve grind, etc. A good production class engine tune from a shop, possibly including some dyno tuning time, may run you $1–2K. And along with your exhaust and re-map/ re-jet that you have already done may net you 6–10hp (if you are lucky, you may not be able to pull that much out of these bikes nowadays, as they are already stretching the limits). Frankly your money is much better spent on more tires and track time, More horsepower is really the last you need. All my experience showed me that time and again. The guy who was out there running every class his bike was eligible to run in (competitive or not), never missed a race weekend, made every practice day, and even traveled to other local tracks (or even better ran the full season at the other tracks) equated to the guy who was going fast, no matter what he was riding. And, I’m not talking just a little faster, but a LOT faster. Your butt in the seat running laps is what will make you fast. You saw it on my team. I was the founding member, with vastly more experience than my teammates, but I was a poor college student. I was lucky often to make 3–4 race weekends a year. My one teammate in particular on the other hand, that before he started racing with me had barely been on a motorcycle before, went crazy. He was out there every weekend without fail, started traveling up to Seattle to run that season too, and just put in the laps. And soon, sad to say, but he was crushing me. As frustrating as that was, as hard as I tried, no matter what I did to make the bike a little faster, he started walking away from me. He was out-braking me, his entry speeds were way higher, he would smoke me mid corner, and his drive out was better too. His bike wasn’t faster than mine (I was the one who worked on it, he wasn’t the most mechanically inclined), it was all him. And, it held for my other teammates too. The more laps they put in, the faster they went, inevitably. Of course natural ability mattered some, as a starting point, but even an outstanding novice is running 10+ seconds a lap slower than an experienced expert class rider. It’s all about the track time. Cost for that time? These might be a bit dated, and vary by organization, but you are looking at around $60 per production class you want to enter, and $100 for every superbike class you want to enter . A 600 prod bike is eligible to run in its class and any higher than it (with maybe some limits depending on the club). So, for example, that means you can run in 600 prod, 600 superbike (modified class), 750 prod, 750 superbike, open prod, and open superbike. (all depending on your club’s class structure). Then, you have the practice days (Saturdays) that precede many of the race Sundays. usually you get 4–6 (depending on red flags) 20 minute sessions for like $120. and, often you are allowed to run in more than one session set, so double your track time there! And even more fun, endurance races! 4, 6, 8, 24 hour endurance races. gte some buddies, a bunch of gas, tires, brakes, and a crapload of spares, and flog that poor bike (and yourself) for hours. He or she who has the most laps at the designated amount of hours wins. Less buddies means more track time for you, but an hour straight on a bike (about all you get before you have to come in to refuel) is taxing. It is all up to what you are physically capable of doing. And believe me, you better be in shape if you intend to run anywhere near that much! Oh, and also being able to afford the expendables, Tires, gas, brakes, and chains. Look to get 3–4 hours track time out of a rear tire, maybe 6 max out of a front, maybe 6–8 out of a set of brake pads, and maybe half (a regular, only running your own class at one track) season out of the chain. Bear in mind mileage will vary depending on multiple factors, including how hard you are pushing stuff, how abrasive the track is, does it have a lot of corners of one way, compared to the other (right hand vs left hand), etc etc. Now granted, if you are running in all those higher classes with your poor flogged on 600 production bike, you will have a really hard time keeping up. But, if you can swing it, like our top rider did for years, run multiple bikes! Then you are getting the track time, and also all the points from placing competitively in all those classes. He was one buff, very fast little dude! And, there are ways you can save/ make money too. Run contingencies (Run brand x, place 1st through something place, and win money). Then, get sponsored! this is common, even at the club level. It (usually) won’t mean you get a full ride or anything, but, things to look for are discounts form shops, like cost plus 10% as the price of goods. this is HUGE!! with all the stuff you will be buying, to get it all at basically 1/2 the normal street price will save you big. And, if you can get that deal from a dealership, so you are getting factory parts... oh, heaven! Then, there are sponsorships you can get for other stuff you use, such as signage, uniforms, etc. Further, get your boss at your real job to sponsor you, help pay your entry fees maybe, or buy your gas. All this in exchange for putting stickers on your bike, putting their logos on your banners, and talking them up when you finally get on that podium (or more likely are standing with all your fellow racers and their family/friends at the end of the track day at the base of the tower grinning ear to ear and accepting your little trophy.) You almost definitely will never MAKE money at the club, or even the semi-pro level, but you can reduce your costs a bit, so you can afford to do it more! So endeth the lesson.

How many bikes does Dhoni have?

Mahendra Singh Dhoni, the former Indian cricket team captain, is not only famous for his exemplary performance in the sport, but also well known for his wide range of cars and motorcycles collection. Some examples of the cars and motorcycles owned by him are the Ferrari 599 GTO, the Yamaha RD350 and more, not to mention his knowledge of the machines parked in his garage Mahendra Singh Dhoni has quit his captaincy of the Indian cricket team, but he will still be loved and respected by its fans across the world for his proficiency in the sport. While everyone is praising his brilliant accolades in the world of cricket, we explore his collection of cars and motorcycles. Audi Q7 Audi Q7 is one the most popular SUVs with the celebrities in India like Arshad Warsi, Bipasha Basu, ,Deepika Padukone,, Emraan Hashmi, John Abraham and many others. Some sportspersons also love this behemoth, one of them being MS Dhoni. Dhoni who owns the previous generation Audi Q7 30 TDI Quattro in black colour. It is powered by a 2,967 cc diesel engine that produces around 242 hp of power and 550 Nm of torque. The Audi Q7 is a premium SUV in the company’s product lineup and it is one of the favourite cars in his garage. Hummer H2 The second SUV owned by the former captain is the 2009 Hummer H2 which is also a black colour SUV. He has been spotted several times driving his H2 in Ranchi, his hometown. In fact, he awestruck the New Zealand cricket team when the match was held in Ranchi (2016 ODI Series) and instead of taking the official crew bus, Dhoni took this big brute. Mitsubishi, Pajero SFX and Outlander Although, Mitsubishi has discontinued the Pajero SFX from its India model lineup, MS Dhoni still owns one. The Pajero is the third SUV owned by MS Dhoni and is a capable off-roader which is powered by a 2.8 litre turbocharged diesel engine producing 120 hp of power and 280 Nm of torque. Another Mitsubishi model which the cricket legend owns is the Outlander which is available only in a petrol engine. The Outlander uses a 2.4 litre MIVEC, naturally aspirated petrol engine that develops 170 hp and 226 Nm. Mahindra Scorpio Not only Mahi, but the then Chief Minister of Gujarat and now the Prime Minister of India, ,Narendra Modi, was fond of the Mahindra Scorpio. The Mahindra Scorpio is one of the most popular SUVs in the country. The Scorpio owned by Dhoni is an open top modified version which has been specially customised for him. His Scorpio is a four-seater version that also has a roll cage. Land Rover, Freelander 2 The last in the list of SUVs owned by MS Dhoni is the Land Rover Freelander 2. The Land Rover Freelander 2 is also in black colour which is powered by a 2.2 litre turbo diesel engine. This engine has two states of tune and generates 148 hp of power and 187 hp of power, torque remaining the same at 420 Nm. Although, this model has been replaced by the ,Land Rover Discovery Sport,, it is one of the most popular models that was sold in India. Ferrari 599 GTO The cricketer also owns a Ferrari 599 GTO with an Indian tricolour painted on the bonnet of the supercar. Under the hood, the Ferrari 599 GTO is powered by a 6.0 litre V12 naturally aspirated petrol engine that generates 661 hp of power and 620 Nm of torque. Along with cars, MS Dhoni is also known for its bike collection. He currently owns 22 motorcycles in his garage. Here is the list of few motorcycle MS Dhoni owns Confederate Hellcat X132 This is the most expensive motorcycle in the Dhoni’s garage. The Confederate Hellcat X132 is powered by a 2.2 litre engine that produces 132 hp of power. MS Dhoni is the only south-east Asian who owns this and there were only 150 units that have been produced. Kawasaki Ninja H2 Another superbike MS Dhoni owns is the Kawasaki Ninja H2, which was launched in India at a price of Rs 29 lakh, ex-showroom, Delhi. It is powered by a 998 cc 4 cylinder supercharged petrol engine that produces 200 hp of power and torque at 134 Nm. The motorcycle can touch a top speed up to 400kmph Yamaha RD350, This is Dhoni’s first motorcycle, the RD350, which he bought only for Rs 4500. The cricketer tweeted the picture of the motorcycle in 2013. The RD350 was the first motorcycle built in India which is still popular with motorcycle enthusiasts. Kawasaki Ninja ZX-14R Another noteworthy mention in his collection of motorcycles is the Kawasaki ZX-14R, one of the fastest production motorcycles in the world. It is powered by a 1,441 cc engine that produces the 197.39 hp of power. The ZX-14R MS Dhoni owns is in black and is priced at Rs 17 lakh. Harley Davidson Fatboy This cruiser motorcycle is one of MS Dhoni’s favourites. It is powered by a 1,690 cc air cooled V-Twin engine that produces 61 hp of power and 132 Nm of torque. Yamaha Thundercat Yamaha Thundercat or YZF600R was manufactured by Yamaha from 1996 to 2007. The sportsbike is powered by a 600 cc engine that produces 100 hp of power and 66 Nm of torque.

Have you adapted parts not intended for the car you were working on, or fabricated something into a part that wasn't one originally?

More times than I’ll ever honestly recall to be truthful. …..I honestly can never recall the countless number of times I used something for a job other than what it was intended for! My latest creation is a 27 HP 2 cylinder gas engine driven water/chemical pump for a very good friend who needs something that can spray upwards of 50–75 YARDS at a time for doing hillsides that are infested with ticks, overrun with weeds etc etc as his company is an environmental company that sprays for insects, kills specific vegetation or can kill ALL vegetation, can target nuisance “weeds/trees/etc etc” as the strongest commercial pump he was able to find could only spray about 75–90 feet… and to get 90 feet there can’t be any headwind or side to side breeze…. If this “new pump”does what we project it to do, instead of having to climb up some horrific terrain and risk serious injury to himself or others, we’re hoping to be able to spray AT LEAST 150 feet, though the math puts the estimated maximum spray range at 147 feet! We had to have a machine shop make a couple I had to “design” to couple the pump to this 27 HP Kawasaki engine I pulled off of a lawn tractor that got hit by a drunk driver. The lawn tractor was totally demolished…fortunately my friend who owned it was across the street (we live on a rural road) emptying his bags that were full of grass clippings. Had he been anywhere near that tractor or behind it, he’d have been killed instantly. I was lucky as the engine was about the ONLY part that was left unscathed, other than the plastic “cowling” & air filter box that were destroyed. When my other friend mentioned he needed to build a much stronger pump, I showed him the engine I’d just “acquired” and now the only four items left to do are to weld the aluminum bars to the water tank frame he has in the bed of his one truck, mount a seperate gas tank for this engine, design an exhaust system that will take as much of the heat away from the water/chemical tank as possible…as it is close enough to where I do believe that melting the tank is a possibility….but in order to have the pump mounted at or below tank level limits where I can mount the engine…..and the last item is to test it…..though we did start it on the ground with a hose in a 5 gallon bucket and it emptied the bucket in less than 30 seconds are went into the trees behind my back yard…which was over 110 feet from the end of my driveway…..and I was BARELY able to restrain that engine & pump from spinning out control.. we’ll find out if we’re good or not in a week or so! My all time FAVORITES involve taking Mustangs & making them CHEVY POWERED BEASTS! Since the early/mid 2000’s, they actually sell kits to make this rather straight forward and simplistic, ESPECIALLY up until the 2003 model year (2004 and up do not have a direct power swap kit available yet, to my knowledge) as the 4.6l V8 Ford sold as a “performance V8” was a dog compared to many others, and adding horsepower to one was outrageously expensive.. This is why a lot of guys started swapping small block Chevy engines into their Mustang GTs or even their V6 Mustangs to make one hell of a wicked “sleeper’! I did a few in the late 1990’s, despite a million Ford 5.0 push-rod engine being available in the scrap yards witht he 1st one one of my “crazier” friends wanted his radical 454 Chevy big block in a 6 Cylinder “MUTT” he purchased to make a radical sleeper car. I have a friend who is a professional welder by trade, so I’d mock up a lot of the parts, he’d fabricate them and weld them….he welded in a 6 point roll cage, sub-frame connectors, fabricated a radically stiffer, more substantial transmission crossmember, fabricated motor mounts and literally countless other components. Being the 454 was a carbureted engine and the car had already been inspected & passed the PA emissions inspection (as a 6 cyl car) the car would NEVER need to pass another emissions test so long as the car travelled LESS THAN 5000 miles per year, as vehicles that travel that little are EXEMPT under PA’s emissions laws! Getting the engine/transmission (stayed with a T-5, just w/ a chevy bellhousing) and even were able to use the stock driveshaft, but it added a few issue to be resolved: We NEEDED at least a 3″ functional hood scoop OR cowl hood, wound up going with a very high end (cost almost $1000.00 in the late 90’s) for a 4″ cowl induction hood that also had open 4′ angled louvers in the front with a “ridge running alongside of them to where the cowl would have blended back into the hoods’ standard body line….on of the best looking hood’s I’ve ever seen to date! We needed to buy a serpentine belt drive system for the 454 with FORD components (alternator, power steering pump etc) which didn’t exist so we wound up scraping together a shitload of GM serpentine belt pulleys from V8 Caprices and changed to a GM power steering pump had to have a custom line made, which turned out to be no trouble as one of the auto-parts stores near us that had a fully functioning machine shop also was the regional “industrial/commercial & automotive” custom hose manufacturer for “GATES” Belts * Hoses! we were able to get a pulley for the alternator that worked and the GM pulley fit the water pump. To be 100% honest I can’t recall for the life of me where/what we used for the crank pulley for the serpentine belt drive! I’m thinking it was a pulley off of a Caprice that was drilled to fit the Ford harmonic balancer, but I honestly am not 100% certain on that…been 20 years or so! Getting headers that fit AND allowed for the performance the customer wanted did not exist. I do not recall which header company he worked with, but he did have a custom set of headers made, in stainless steel, that bolted right up to a stock location Mustang GT exhaust system. I have no clue how much he paid to have those made, but I know it was outrageously expensive, compared to what “normal” “high end headers” ($500.00-$750.00) cost back then. The last issue was coming up with enough front spring pressure to pick the front end up high enough to allow for Camber/Caster to be reasonably close to specification. The fact that he didn’t only want to drag this car…he wanted to be able to drive it on the street, enter hill climbs & such played into one of my strongest suits, performance suspension/chassis/brakes. We wound up going with a set of tubular lower control arms, a pair of coil over front struts with a large range of adjustment for ride height and more than double the stock spring rate at stock height. We added tubular lower control arms to the rear, an airbag in the r/r spring for drag racing 9it was never inflated more than 9.0 psi though usually gave maximum traction at/around 8.25–8.50 psi of air pressure and drop shocks, but the drop shocks were only on for drag racing….they had to be removed for street driving/handling. I have no idea what happened to this guy or this car as I lost touch with him after I got sick in early 2004. I know he had the car in the mid 9’s and it was legitimately , technically “street legal”, it wasn’t exactly a comfortable car to drive for a cruise at all. That was the “QUICKEST” car I’d ever built up to that stage of my career, though I’ve since built a few that would beat that car flat out. I also did the body & paint for that car and wish I had a scanner as it had a very uniques, distinct paint job on it with a 7 color fade with just enough “Diamond Ice” to add some “FLASH” that never looked the same. depending on the angle you viewed the car from and how the light hit it.

Where do I get more information on the masks?

Problem — Living in Japan, I have been following the YouTubes of John Campbell (Ph.D. in Nursing Education) and Chris Mortenson (Ph.D. in Toxicology) for about a month now … and Chris Mortenson has been especially critical of the U.S. Federal Government getting caught flat-footed without either knowledge (or up til now, interest in) the efficacy of masks, current production, and capacity to produce. Chris is particularly good about advocating the use of masks, as well as the YouTubes of Canadian Prepper. Here is Chris’s latest, and from around 13:00, he gives a brief breakdown of cultural - government response to the virus regarding masks. ,At 16:30 you will see a clear example of the fundamental contradiction between the values of Corporate Capitalism and those of human communities. The Guardian gives an example of America Inc.’s priorities up until now … Trump privately appeals to Asia and Europe for medical help to fight coronavirus But the former Empire can’t afford to throw stones either … Doctors threaten to quit NHS over shortage of protective kit On a lighter note … here is a funny, and somewhat accurate overview of the types of masks you are likely to encounter … Msi Sakib's answer to What’s the best mask to wear to avoid the current coronavirus we’re getting right now? Solution — 1 — Especially for those in countries which do not have a culture of using masks during the flu-season or hay-fever season, keep an eye on Amazon for if, or when disposable surgical masks are available … but for most Americans, that option does not seem to be of immediate practical help. 2 — ,User-11076068587505040784's answer to What if we can't buy a mask? Klaus Breslauer’s, Quora answer is worth its weight in gold. 3 — Once you either buy or make masks, don’t dispose of them after a single use. Whereas microwave ovens will not disinfect those masks, and even gentle hand washing will significantly diminish the effectiveness of the masks … a U.V. light box ,may, prolong the usefulness of those masks. This virus is still new, and I haven’t yet seen studies showing the effectiveness of U.V. light on this virus. But U.V. light has been shown to be effective on most other bacteria and viruses. Here is Canadian Prepper’s take on the importance of a U.V. light box. Most of us can not find or buy such a fancy piece of kit at this point … BUT there is a cheaper way. Make your own. The total cost for the light, a box, and reflective liner can be as cheap as $50.00, portable, cheap to run, and built in less than an hour. I’ve made a small one, just big enough for a mask, smart phone, and house keys at this time, but am starting a re-build with better reflective material to line the box, and a taller box to hold multiple masks. Some practical advice: 1 - Don’t be fooled by the low wattage of these lights (typically between 5 and 20 watts) … these are not the ‘black light’ toys of your bong-water, shag carpet, dorm room days. They don’t put out much heat, BUT these CAN cause eye damage — up to blindness, and skin damage — up to cancer. Installing these in a closed box is important for your own health. Here is an almost exact replica of one of two lights I am using … ,Amazon.com: LAMPTOP 8W 110v 60Hz UV Sterilizer Ozone light with 24 Hour Plug-in Mechanical Timer,UVC Light Cleaning Light Sanitizing for Cabinet Household Shoes: Home Improvement Here is a post leading up to my first build … ,Steve Martin (Steven Martin)'s answer to With the current coronavirus outbreak creating a shortage of disposable masks, can or should those masks be used, sterilized, and reused?,. Functional, but shoddy compared to what I hope to post in a day or so … For those not familiar with Japan, it is not unusual to see most of the store staff in disposable surgical masks … and I observed only half of customers, including myself, with a mask. But I didn’t know whether to laugh, or clean my pants when I saw this guy passing in front of my car in the parking lot … full hazmat suit and mask … so I compromised, and took a couple of pics. A couple of lessons learned from my first build — • two lights are overkill, one should be enough with all that reflective lining, and • the box is too short. I will disassemble this build, and reassemble into two separate boxes (one for a local community cafe), and the next boxes will have lift-off tops, cover a bit more floor space, and be taller — so that several masks can be hung by their ear straps from hooks attached to the bottom of the lift-off lid. A cheap plastic box is fine, especially if … 2 - lined with aluminum or some other reflective surface. I used aluminum foil in my first build, but bought some higher quality reflective material used in kitchens here in Japan. The U.V. light is effective only in line-of-sight to the DNA and RNA of the target bacteria and viruses. The reflective lining will both protect the user, and multiply the lines-of-sight for maximum effectiveness. 3 - It appears that the virus can remain dangerous for several days at a time … on a surface and without a host … so make your box tall enough to install little clips from which to hang several masks at a time — and if you have enough masks per person, rotate between a dozen or so, using a freshly disinfected mask each day. 4 - If U.V. does prove to be effective on cutting down these critters as with past viruses, it appears 30 minutes of zapping will be enough. 5 - Don’t rely on masks as the end-all and be-all. Flatten the curve to keep hospital beds open for those who need it. In addition to masks, this means: • Try to keep a couple of meters distance between yourself and others. • Wash your hands with soap frequently. I think it was a MedCram YouTube that explained how soap cuts through one of a lipid layer encasing the virus’s RNA. • Think about wearing tightly fitting goggles. This thing can enter through the eyes as well. Swim goggles are cheap, and I bought a couple … but for now, I feel somewhat secure with a cheap pair of plastic glasses that have a silicone liner to keep out pollen. • Keep small things clean … including door handles, smartphones, keys, etc. The U.V. light box will not damage your phone, and in fact, some enterprising minds are making a small killing on selling UV light sanitizers for your phone on Amazon. • Try learning to enjoy a bit of down-time at home. I realize we are social primates, and so for those who are somewhat intellectually antsy when it comes to extended reading, writing, learning some new musical chops, etc … there is always social media. I get a kick out of ,Trevor Noah,, and YouTube is a wealth of adventure ... everything from Marlin fishing from kayaks, to great moments in sports, to exploring those great physics videos of ,David Butler,, and a special passion of mine … jazz … though Esperanza Spalding might be cutting a little too close to the jugular with this one … ‘Endangered Species’. For better or worse, nothing will be as it was, tomorrow. … while enjoying my down time with a little 6% alcohol / grapefruit juice concoction by Suntory, trying to make the best of a bad situation. Tokyo will be going under ‘advised lock down in a couple of days. Clever virus … becoming a danger only AFTER the Olympics has been officially postponed. Clever virus indeed. 🤔 Take care all. – steve ——————————————————— p.s. I wrote the above a year ago, and acted on the best information I had at the time. A year has come and gone, and now I know … it is NOT a virus I should be afraid of. It is the ruling elite, their puppet governments, and technocrat enablers. Among the socio-historical precedents I call on include Howard Zinn … Noam Chomsky … Naomi Klein … Michael Sandel’s ‘The Tyranny of Merit: What Has Become of the Common Good?’ Soshana Zuboff … Some of the more ‘scientific’ sources that have further caused me to lose faith in all institutions … T.S. Kuhn … Karl Popper … Joe Scott’s YouTube videos, particularly this one … Reminds me of the late William Blum, CIA analyst and author. Shortly before he died, I was in touch with him about a volunteer project for an audiobook version of ‘Killing Hope’ … But back to ‘science’ Judy Mikovits … (notice that Wikipedia does not have a well deserved page for this book, and her wikipage has been heavily edited to paint her as far less the professional that she was … is … ) Kary Mullis, (Nobel Prize winning inventor of PCR, and NOT a fan of Fauci, and a VERY entertaining read) … And now for the names who are being demonetized, shadow banned, banned, or methodically erased from digital history … I first began to suspect something was not not quite right with the officially approved narrative thanks to Chris Martenson (Ph.D. Toxicology, Duke) mentioned earlier. His YouTubes regarding the virus are still up, but demonetized, and his Wikipedia page has been removed. Much thanks to Chris for the heads up about the furin cleavage site, and perverse incentives behind the official narrative. A sample … New Zealand’s own Dr. Sam Bailey … a national treasure that piqued my interest in Kary Mullis and finding out exactly what the PCR can and can not do … and how profit and power driven institutions are purposely using a high cycling to magnify and detect RNA bits, and a low cycling to ‘prove’ effectiveness of more than questionable vaccines. Dr. Lee Merritt (decades as a military medical doctor) … Senator and Doctor Scott Jenson … No perverse incentives for Dr. John Lee. He’s retired, and that little blue WHO tag means the video is most likely demonetized. And countless others I have been saving to hard disc … mostly those who have migrated from Alphabet Inc. (Google/YouTube) because of censorship … The Last American Vagabond, The Corbett Report, Geert Vanden Bossche, the interview with the undercover nurse in New York, etc. In light of the above … this is more than believable … If no other, I urge the reader to read this link … well worth the time. I am sitting here updating this as of Sunday, May 2 … midway through Japan’s ‘Golden Week’ holiday. And wouldn’t you know it? The cases of those testing ‘positive’ (deliberate, disingenuous misuse of PCR fear-porn) have peaked at just the right time to put the greater Tokyo Metropolitan area (Kawasaki and Yokohama) and Osaka into partial lockdown, further putting community owned businesses and minumum wage contract workers at risk. Pubs and restaurants are forbidden by emergency law from serving alcohol … as are are families are also prohibited from drinking alcoholic beverages outside their house at a barbecue or picnic. This is driving people to the safety of their houses and the constant drone of corporate - state media. Clever virus. Clever enough to know that institutions and a few individuals representing concentrations of wealth and power need to suck up real wealth of natural resources and the sweat of the working class to keep those neo-liberal gears a grinding. Clever virus indeed. A year ago, I was resourceful enough, scared enough, and compassionate enough to make disinfectant UV light boxes for friends and local community centers. Now, I am more inclined to follow and chat with the likes of Bull Hansen … Ron Paul … And thanks to the above, a new find in the Pholosopher … Her interview on the Ron Paul show was spot on. It is not the virus we should be worried about. It is those faux-leaders who are ambitious to compete for their spot in a zero-sum game of King-of-the-Mountain, and rule over others, those among us governed by ‘dark-triad’ personality traits … the pathological narcissists, machiavellian opportunists, and morphologically defined psychopaths among us. Our institutions … education, science, journalism, governance, public health … have all been captured by corporate interests. Beware that Elysium/Matrix possibility of forced injections of experimental gene therapy and vaccine passports … for the bulk of us. We disposable human capital. Disposable, yes. But not without ‘Tower of Babel’ consequences. ‘’Thus, Norse society’s structure created a conflict between the short-term interests of those in power, and the long-term interests of the society as a whole. Much of what the chiefs and clergy valued proved eventually harmful to the society. Yet the society’s values were at the root of its strengths as well as of its weaknesses. The Greenland Norse did succeed in creating a unique form of European society, and in surviving for 450 years as Europe’s most remote outpost. We modern Americans should not be too quick to brand them as failures, when their society survived in Greenland for longer than our English-speaking society has survived so far in North America. Ultimately, though, the chiefs found themselves without followers. The last right that they obtained for themselves was the privilege of being the last to starve.’’ Diamond, Jared. Collapse (p. 276). Penguin Publishing Group. Kindle Edition. Don’t take my word for it … I am just a run of the mill conspiracy theorist. A witch. ‘THIMK ,for yourselves’. Cheers all … and thank YOU, anonymous Quora moderator, for forwarding my outdated answer to a thousand readers … so that I could follow the scientific method and revise my answer. — steve

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