Malaysia looks to hydrogen to reduce greenhouse gases by 45% but is it just all talk?

CY Foong · Jul 28, 2021 11:20 AM

Malaysia looks to hydrogen to reduce greenhouse gases by 45% but is it just all talk? 01

As nations around the world try to implement solutions to reduce their respective greenhouse gases, one of those solutions is to rely on hydrogen. Environment and Water Minister Datuk Seri Tuan Ibrahim Tuan Man said that the hydrogen economy can reduce the country’s greenhouse gases by 45% by 2030.

Malaysia looks to hydrogen to reduce greenhouse gases by 45% but is it just all talk? 02

One of 2 hydrogen-powered Hyundai Nexos used by Sarawak Energy

He said that as a signatory to the Paris Agreement, Malaysia is committed to achieving its target to reduce carbon emissions.

Malaysia looks to hydrogen to reduce greenhouse gases by 45% but is it just all talk? 03

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Tuan Ibrahim was officiating the virtual “International Hydrogen Economy Forum and Strategic Lab” which was organised to identify hydrogen technology initiatives and create more opportunities for green investments.

Malaysia looks to hydrogen to reduce greenhouse gases by 45% but is it just all talk? 01

A hydrogen fuel station in Japan

The hydrogen economy relies on hydrogen as a commercial field that would deliver a substantial fraction of a nation’s energy and services. This replaces conventional fuels that cause environmental pollution like petrol and diesel.

Also read: To make ever better, cleaner cars, Toyota raced and broke this hydrogen-powered Corolla for 24 hours

Malaysia looks to hydrogen to reduce greenhouse gases by 45% but is it just all talk? 02

The minister added that the Ministry of Environment and Water welcomes strategic cooperation and investments from any party, public or private, as well as regulatory bodies in the pursuit of the hydrogen economy.

Malaysia looks to hydrogen to reduce greenhouse gases by 45% but is it just all talk? 03

3 years later, it's been quiet

While the idea for hydrogen-powered cars entering the Malaysian market sounds enticing, Malaysia’s initiatives for green energy are somewhat mixed.

Malaysia looks to hydrogen to reduce greenhouse gases by 45% but is it just all talk? 04

The Malaysian EV Owners' Club (MyEVOC) pointed out on Twitter that back in 2016, Malaysia announced plans to set up 125,000 charging stations by 2020 to promote electric vehicles. In reality, fewer than 500 charging stations were built till today and at least 12 are fast-charging DC chargers.

Also read: Zero tax for EVs in Malaysia soon, but there's a catch

Malaysia looks to hydrogen to reduce greenhouse gases by 45% but is it just all talk? 05

Which is a cooler police car? Tesla or Civic?

Meanwhile, neighbouring countries like Indonesia and Thailand are encouraging the use of electric vehicles with rebates and even their government fleet vehicles will be switched to EVs.

Also read: Full speed ahead for Thailand’s National EV Policy Committee, 750k xEVs by 2030

Malaysia looks to hydrogen to reduce greenhouse gases by 45% but is it just all talk? 06

What Malaysia is lacking compared to our neighbours is commitment. As the saying goes, “Talk is cheap”, we can go on and harp around on our intentions but rarely do we actually implement it. It is understandable that these plans and roadmaps would take far longer than the expected timeline but just look at our EV plans from 5 years ago.

Also read: Electric cars are here, but is Malaysia ready for them?

Malaysia looks to hydrogen to reduce greenhouse gases by 45% but is it just all talk? 07

A fleet of hydrogen-powered buses in Kuching

With electric vehicles struggling to attract most Malaysian buyers and poor infrastructure as a whole, is the vision of a Malaysia running on hydrogen economy nothing more than simple pleasantries?

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CY Foong

Writer

Traded advertising for a career that fits his passion for cars. Enjoys spotting cars during his free time and has a soft spot for Japanese Kei cars but drives a thirsty manual sedan.

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