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New 2022 Ford Ranger rendered, do you like what you see?

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Ford Ranger XLT Plus facelifted in Malaysia! RM 129,888, new front design

Sime Darby Auto ConneXion (SDAC) introduces a quick update for the Ford Ranger XLT Plus variant.

SDAC-Ford offers up to 20-percent discount for service customers from now until 31 May

Sime Darby Auto ConneXion (SDAC), the sole distributor for Ford in Malaysia, has announced a service

In Brief: Ford Ranger, combining the best of utilitarian and refinement

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This Ford Ranger makes 405 PS and has gull-wing doors

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Geely delivers 30 units of the Geely Jiaji to Chinese police department

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2021 Ford Bronco looks set to wrangle the competition

Finally, the 2021 Ford Bronco has been unleashed to the world.

Save up to RM 8k on a new Ford Ranger Raptor or a Ranger Wildtrak!

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All-new 2021 Ford F-150 can do 1,126 km with one tank of petrol

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Spied: New Ford Ranger Raptor spotted in Thailand, all-new or facelift?

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This is why Ford is making artificial bird poop

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2021 Ford Bronco to launch on 13 July, fights Jeep lineup

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New vs Old – 2021 Ford Ranger Wildtrak facelift vs pre-facelift

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Ford Ranger enjoys 12 % increase in sales in Q3 2019

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ford nj county Post Review

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FULTON COUNTY, GA County, GA Buena Vista County, Iowa Ford County, KS Lowell, MA Malden, MA Clark County, NV Washoe County, NEVADA Middlesex County, NJ Union County, NJ Erie County, NY Benson County, ND Rolette County, ND Texas County, OK https://t.co/NQwoIzM0EO

Peapack & Gladstone Police Department, Somerset County NJ Unit 7. 2020 Ford F-150 https://t.co/iBz82mVU0c

NJ | FREEHOLD BOROUGH | SHOOTING | FORD AVE & LLOYD | U/D COUNTY EMERG RESP TEAM ACTIVATED & AIDING. AREA IS PRESENTLY SHUTDOWN |

First of all, the usage of the term clearly included the East Coast until racists like Sanders twisted it. Lawrence, Mass; Bethlehem, Pa, &c

#NorthJersey #NJ Ford F-150 Performance Parts in Bergen County, NJ: The post Ford F-150… #NewJersey #Mustang

Lakewood, NJ – Prosecutor’s Office Seeks Missing Boy, 17: Lakewood, NJ – Marlene Lynch Ford, the Ocean County prosecutor, issued a de...

*READ LINK FOR DETAILED LIST* ALASKA County, Arizona Cochise County, Arizona MARICOPA COUNTY, AZ Navajo County, Arizona Sacramento County, California San Mateo County, CA DeSoto County, FL Palm Beach County, FL Pinellas County, FL

ford nj county Q&A Review

What's the most popular (frequently occurring) county name in the U.S.?

Washington, is the most frequently occurring county name (31 times.) There is a general theme of the last names of presidents being popular. There is a Wikipedia article with a list of the most commonly occurring county names here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_the_most_common_U.S._county_names And here is a complete list of repeated county names sorted by frequency: 31 Washington: WI, FL, TX, LA, NC, NE, TN, NY, PA, RI, VA, CO, AL, AR, VT, IL, GA, IN, IA, ID, ME, MD, OK, OH, UT, MO, MN, KS, MS, KY, OR 26 Jefferson: WA, WI, WV, FL, TX, LA, NE, TN, NY, PA, CO, AL, AR, IL, GA, IN, IA, ID, OK, OH, MO, KS, MT, MS, KY, OR 25 Franklin: WA, FL, TX, LA, NC, NE, TN, NY, PA, VA, AL, AR, VT, IL, GA, IN, IA, ID, ME, MA, OH, MO, KS, MS, KY 24 Lincoln: WA, WI, WV, WY, NM, LA, NC, NE, TN, NV, CO, AR, GA, ID, ME, OK, MO, MN, KS, MT, MS, KY, OR, SD 24 Jackson: WI, WV, FL, TX, LA, NC, TN, CO, AL, AR, IL, GA, IN, IA, OK, OH, MO, MN, MI, KS, MS, KY, OR, SD 20 Madison: VA, MS, TX, OH, MO, NC, AL, NE, TN, NY, LA, MT, IL, GA, IN, IA, KY, FL, ID, AR 19 Montgomery: VA, KS, MS, TX, MD, MO, NC, DC, AL, TN, NY, PA, IL, GA, IN, IA, KY, OH, AR 18 Union: NJ, MS, OH, NC, NM, TN, IA, LA, PA, IL, GA, IN, SC, KY, FL, OR, AR, SD 18 Clay: KS, MN, MS, TX, MO, NC, AL, NE, TN, WV, AR, IL, GA, IN, IA, KY, FL, SD 17 Monroe: MS, WV, MO, OH, MI, AL, WI, TN, NY, PA, IL, GA, IN, IA, KY, FL, AR 17 Marion: KS, IA, MS, TX, OH, MO, AL, TN, WV, AR, IL, GA, IN, SC, KY, FL, OR 16 Wayne: MS, WV, UT, MO, NC, MI, NE, TN, NY, PA, IL, GA, IN, IA, KY, OH 15 Grant: OK, NM, WA, LA, MN, ND, NE, WI, KS, WV, AR, IN, KY, OR, SD 14 Warren: VA, NJ, MS, OH, MO, NC, TN, NY, PA, IL, GA, IN, IA, KY 14 Greene: VA, MS, OH, MO, NC, AL, TN, NY, PA, IL, GA, IN, IA, AR 13 Carroll: NH, MD, GA, VA, MO, OH, TN, AR, IL, MS, IN, IA, KY 12 Polk: MN, TX, MO, NC, NE, WI, TN, AR, GA, IA, FL, OR 12 Marshall: KS, OK, MN, AL, TN, WV, IL, MS, IN, IA, KY, SD 12 Lee: VA, MS, TX, NC, AL, IA, AR, IL, GA, SC, KY, FL 12 Lake: CO, OH, CA, MN, MI, TN, MT, IL, IN, FL, OR, SD 12 Johnson: KS, TX, MO, NE, TN, AR, IL, GA, IN, IA, KY, WY 12 Douglas: CO, WA, MO, MN, NE, WI, KS, IL, GA, OR, NV, SD 12 Clark: WA, OH, MO, WI, KS, AR, IL, IN, KY, ID, NV, SD 12 Adams: CO, WA, OH, ND, NE, WI, PA, IL, MS, IN, IA, ID 11 Pike: GA, OH, MO, AL, WV, PA, IL, MS, IN, KY, AR 11 Morgan: CO, OH, UT, MO, AL, TN, WV, IL, GA, IN, KY 11 Lawrence: OH, MO, AL, TN, PA, IL, MS, IN, KY, AR, SD 11 Fayette: TX, OH, AL, TN, WV, PA, IL, GA, IN, IA, KY 11 Crawford: OH, MO, MI, WI, KS, PA, IL, GA, IN, IA, AR 11 Calhoun: IA, GA, TX, MI, AL, WV, AR, IL, MS, SC, FL 10 Scott: KS, MO, MN, TN, AR, IL, MS, IN, IA, KY 10 Perry: OH, MO, AL, TN, PA, IL, MS, IN, KY, AR 10 Logan: OK, OH, ND, NE, KS, WV, AR, IL, CO, KY 10 Henry: VA, OH, MO, AL, TN, IL, GA, IN, IA, KY 10 Hancock: ME, GA, OH, TN, WV, IL, MS, IN, IA, KY 10 Hamilton: KS, TX, OH, NE, TN, NY, IL, IN, IA, FL 9 Shelby: TX, OH, MO, AL, TN, IL, IN, IA, KY 9 Putnam: WV, OH, MO, TN, NY, IL, GA, IN, FL 9 Knox: ME, TX, OH, MO, NE, TN, IL, IN, KY 9 Clinton: OH, MO, MI, NY, PA, IL, IN, IA, KY 9 Cass: TX, MI, MO, MN, ND, NE, IL, IN, IA 9 Brown: TX, OH, MN, NE, WI, KS, IL, IN, SD 9 Benton: WA, MO, MN, TN, AR, MS, IN, IA, OR 8 Webster: GA, LA, MO, NE, WV, MS, IA, KY 8 Randolph: MO, NC, AL, WV, AR, IL, GA, IN 8 Orange: VA, TX, CA, NC, NY, VT, IN, FL 8 Mercer: NJ, OH, MO, ND, WV, PA, IL, KY 8 Jasper: GA, TX, MO, IA, IL, MS, IN, SC 8 Harrison: TX, OH, MO, WV, MS, IN, IA, KY 8 Fulton: OH, NY, PA, IL, GA, IN, KY, AR 8 Cumberland: ME, VA, NJ, NC, TN, PA, IL, KY 8 Columbia: WA, WI, NY, PA, GA, FL, OR, AR 8 Cherokee: OK, TX, NC, AL, KS, IA, GA, SC 8 Butler: OH, MO, AL, NE, KS, PA, IA, KY 8 Boone: MO, NE, WV, AR, IL, IN, IA, KY 7 Taylor: TX, WI, WV, GA, IA, KY, FL 7 Richland: OH, LA, ND, WI, MT, IL, SC 7 Pulaski: VA, MO, AR, IL, GA, IN, KY 7 Lewis: WA, WV, MO, TN, NY, KY, ID 7 Howard: MD, TX, MO, NE, AR, IN, IA 6 York: NH, ME, VA, NE, PA, SC 6 Sullivan: NH, MO, TN, NY, PA, IN 6 Newton: GA, TX, MO, AR, MS, IN 6 Martin: MN, TX, NC, IN, KY, FL 6 Macon: MO, NC, AL, TN, IL, GA 6 Livingston: LA, MO, MI, NY, IL, KY 6 Lafayette: LA, MO, WI, AR, MS, FL 6 Jones: GA, TX, NC, MS, IA, SD 6 Hardin: TX, OH, TN, IL, IA, KY 6 Garfield: CO, WA, UT, NE, MT, OK 6 Floyd: VA, TX, GA, IN, IA, KY 6 Delaware: OK, OH, NY, PA, IN, IA 6 Custer: CO, NE, MT, OK, ID, SD 5 White: TN, AR, IL, GA, IN 5 Sheridan: KS, MT, ND, NE, WY 5 San juan: PR, UT, CO, NM, WA 5 Saline: KS, MO, AR, IL, NE 5 Pierce: WI, ND, GA, WA, NE 5 Mitchell: IA, KS, NC, TX, GA 5 Mason: WV, KY, MI, TX, WA 5 Lyon: IA, KS, KY, MN, NV 5 Kent: MD, DE, MI, RI, TX 5 Houston: TN, MN, AL, GA, TX 5 Henderson: TN, KY, NC, IL, TX 5 Essex: VT, NJ, VA, MA, NY 5 Decatur: TN, IA, KS, GA, IN 5 Dallas: IA, MO, AR, AL, TX 5 Clarke: MS, VA, IA, AL, GA 5 Carter: TN, MT, KY, OK, MO 5 Campbell: TN, VA, KY, WY, SD 5 Caldwell: KY, NC, MO, TX, LA 5 Anderson: SC, TN, KY, KS, TX 5 Allen: KS, KY, IN, LA, OH 4 Wood: WV, TX, WI, OH 4 Wilson: TN, KS, NC, TX 4 Wheeler: TX, OR, GA, NE 4 Van buren: TN, IA, AR, MI 4 Sumter: SC, FL, AL, GA 4 Somerset: ME, MD, NJ, PA 4 Smith: TN, KS, TX, MS 4 Sherman: KS, OR, TX, NE 4 Russell: KS, VA, KY, AL 4 Richmond: NY, NC, GA, VA 4 Phillips: KS, MT, AR, CO 4 Ottawa: KS, OK, MI, OH 4 Mineral: WV, CO, NV, MT 4 Middlesex: VA, NJ, MA, CT 4 Linn: IA, KS, MO, OR 4 Liberty: MT, FL, TX, GA 4 Lancaster: SC, VA, PA, NE 4 Lamar: MS, AL, GA, TX 4 Iron: UT, MO, MI, WI 4 Grundy: TN, IA, MO, IL 4 Fremont: IA, CO, ID, WY 4 Dodge: MN, WI, GA, NE 4 De kalb: IL, AL, GA, IN 4 Dawson: MT, NE, GA, TX 4 Carbon: MT, PA, WY, UT 4 Camden: NJ, NC, MO, GA 4 Blaine: MT, OK, NE, ID 4 Adair: IA, KY, OK, MO 3 Wyoming: NY, PA, WV 3 Wright: IA, MO, MN 3 Worth: IA, MO, GA 3 Winnebago: IA, IL, WI 3 Williamson: TN, IL, TX 3 Walker: AL, GA, TX 3 Vernon: MO, WI, LA 3 Valley: MT, NE, ID 3 Todd: KY, MN, SD 3 Thomas: KS, NE, GA 3 Teton: MT, ID, WY 3 Sussex: VA, NJ, DE 3 Summit: UT, CO, OH 3 Suffolk: NY, MA, CT 3 Stone: MO, AR, MS 3 Stevens: KS, MN, WA 3 Stephens: OK, TX, GA 3 Stark: ND, IL, OH 3 Sioux: IA, ND, NE 3 Sierra: CA, NM, NV 3 Sevier: TN, UT, AR 3 Seminole: OK, FL, GA 3 Schuyler: NY, MO, IL 3 Rock: MN, NE, WI 3 Rockingham: NH, VA, NC 3 Robertson: TN, KY, TX 3 Potter: PA, TX, SD 3 Pope: MN, IL, AR 3 Platte: MO, NE, WY 3 Pickens: SC, AL, GA 3 Pawnee: KS, OK, NE 3 Park: MT, CO, WY 3 Osceola: IA, MI, FL 3 Osage: KS, MO, OK 3 Orleans: NY, VT, LA 3 Oneida: NY, ID, WI 3 Ohio: WV, KY, IN 3 Northampton: VA, NC, PA 3 Noble: IN, OK, OH 3 Nelson: VA, KY, ND 3 Murray: MN, OK, GA 3 Morris: KS, NJ, TX 3 Moore: TN, NC, TX 3 Miller: MO, AR, GA 3 Miami: KS, IN, OH 3 Meade: KS, KY, SD 3 Mcpherson: KS, NE, SD 3 Mclean: KY, ND, IL 3 Mcintosh: OK, ND, GA 3 Lowndes: MS, AL, GA 3 Lauderdale: TN, AL, MS 3 La salle: IL, TX, LA 3 Kiowa: KS, CO, OK 3 Humboldt: IA, CA, NV 3 Holmes: FL, MS, OH 3 Haskell: KS, OK, TX 3 Hall: NE, GA, TX 3 Grayson: VA, KY, TX 3 Graham: KS, NC, AZ 3 Gallatin: MT, KY, IL 3 Fairfield: SC, OH, CT 3 Erie: NY, PA, OH 3 Ellis: KS, OK, TX 3 Edwards: KS, IL, TX 3 Dickinson: IA, KS, MI 3 De soto: FL, MS, LA 3 Delta: CO, MI, TX 3 Daviess: KY, MO, IN 3 Dade: MO, FL, GA 3 Cook: MN, IL, GA 3 Comanche: KS, OK, TX 3 Coffee: TN, AL, GA 3 Cleveland: NC, OK, AR 3 Claiborne: TN, MS, LA 3 Christian: MO, KY, IL 3 Choctaw: OK, AL, MS 3 Chippewa: MN, MI, WI 3 Cheyenne: KS, CO, NE 3 Chester: SC, TN, PA 3 Cedar: IA, MO, NE 3 Cameron: PA, TX, LA 3 Butte: CA, ID, SD 3 Burke: NC, ND, GA 3 Buffalo: NE, WI, SD 3 Buchanan: IA, VA, MO 3 Bedford: TN, VA, PA 3 Beaver: UT, PA, OK 3 Baker: FL, OR, GA 2 Yuma: AZ, CO 2 Worcester: MD, MA 2 Woodford: KY, IL 2 Wise: VA, TX 2 Winston: AL, MS 2 Windham: VT, CT 2 Williams: ND, OH 2 Wilkinson: MS, GA 2 Wilkes: NC, GA 2 Wilcox: AL, GA 2 Wichita: KS, TX 2 Whitley: KY, IN 2 Westmoreland: VA, PA 2 Wells: ND, IN 2 Ward: ND, TX 2 Walworth: WI, SD 2 Walton: FL, GA 2 Wabash: IL, IN 2 Vermilion: IL, LA 2 Upshur: WV, TX 2 Tyler: WV, TX 2 Turner: GA, SD 2 Trinity: CA, TX 2 Tipton: TN, IN 2 Tioga: NY, PA 2 Thurston: NE, WA 2 Texas: MO, OK 2 Terrell: TX, GA 2 Tazewell: VA, IL 2 Talbot: MD, GA 2 Surry: VA, NC 2 Sumner: TN, KS 2 Stokes: VA, NC 2 Stewart: TN, GA 2 Steuben: NY, IN 2 Steele: MN, ND 2 St. clair: MO, AL 2 Stanton: KS, NE 2 Stanley: NC, SD 2 Stafford: KS, VA 2 Spencer: KY, IN 2 Southeast fairbanks: AK, WA 2 Simpson: KY, MS 2 Shannon: MO, SD 2 Seward: KS, NE 2 Seneca: NY, OH 2 Sedgwick: KS, CO 2 Scotland: MO, NC 2 Santa cruz: CA, AZ 2 San miguel: CO, NM 2 Saint louis: MO, MN 2 Sabine: TX, LA 2 Rutherford: TN, NC 2 Rusk: TX, WI 2 Rush: KS, IN 2 Rowan: KY, NC 2 Roosevelt: MT, NM 2 Roberts: TX, SD 2 Roane: TN, WV 2 Ripley: MO, IN 2 Rio grande: PR, CO 2 Rice: KS, MN 2 Renville: MN, ND 2 Red river: TX, LA 2 Ramsey: MN, ND 2 Quitman: MS, GA 2 Prince george's: MD, DC 2 Prairie: MT, AR 2 Powell: MT, KY 2 Pottawatomie: KS, OK 2 Portage: WI, OH 2 Pontotoc: OK, MS 2 Pocahontas: IA, WV 2 Plymouth: IA, MA 2 Phelps: MO, NE 2 Perkins: NE, SD 2 Pennington: MN, SD 2 Pendleton: WV, KY 2 Paulding: GA, OH 2 Panola: TX, MS 2 Page: IA, VA 2 Owyhee: ID, NV 2 Owen: KY, IN 2 Ouachita: AR, LA 2 Otsego: NY, MI 2 Otero: CO, NM 2 Oldham: KY, TX 2 Oconee: SC, GA 2 Northumberland: VA, PA 2 Nicholas: WV, KY 2 Nevada: CA, AR 2 Nemaha: KS, NE 2 Nassau: NY, FL 2 Morton: KS, ND 2 Modoc: CA, OR 2 Mississippi: MO, AR 2 Mills: IA, TX 2 Midland: MI, TX 2 Menominee: MI, WI 2 Menard: IL, TX 2 Meigs: TN, OH 2 Medina: TX, OH 2 Mecklenburg: VA, NC 2 Mchenry: ND, IL 2 Mcdowell: WV, NC 2 Marquette: MI, WI 2 Lucas: IA, OH 2 Louisa: IA, VA 2 Limestone: AL, TX 2 Leon: FL, TX 2 Laurens: SC, GA 2 Lane: KS, OR 2 King: TX, WA 2 Kings: NY, CA 2 Kendall: IL, TX 2 Kane: UT, IL 2 Juneau: AK, WI 2 Johnston: NC, OK 2 Jefferson davis: MS, LA 2 Jeff davis: TX, GA 2 Iowa: IA, WI 2 Hyde: NC, SD 2 Hutchinson: TX, SD 2 Huron: MI, OH 2 Humphreys: TN, MS 2 Hughes: OK, SD 2 Hopkins: KY, TX 2 Holt: MO, NE 2 Hillsborough: NH, FL 2 Hill: MT, TX 2 Highland: VA, OH 2 Hidalgo: NM, TX 2 Hickman: TN, KY 2 Haywood: TN, NC 2 Hart: KY, GA 2 Harris: TX, GA 2 Harper: KS, OK 2 Harlan: KY, NE 2 Harding: NM, SD 2 Hardeman: TN, TX 2 Hampshire: WV, MA 2 Halifax: VA, NC 2 Hale: AL, TX 2 Guam: CA, GU 2 Guadalupe: NM, TX 2 Greenwood: SC, KS 2 Green: KY, WI 2 Greeley: KS, NE 2 Gray: KS, TX 2 Grand: UT, CO 2 Grady: OK, GA 2 Golden valley: MT, ND 2 Gloucester: VA, NJ 2 Gilmer: WV, GA 2 Giles: TN, VA 2 Gibson: TN, IN 2 Genesee: NY, MI 2 Frederick: MD, VA 2 Forsyth: NC, GA 2 Forest: PA, WI 2 Ford: KS, IL 2 Florence: SC, WI 2 Fillmore: MN, NE 2 Fannin: TX, GA 2 Escambia: FL, AL 2 Emmet: IA, MI 2 El paso: CO, TX 2 Elmore: AL, ID 2 Elk: KS, PA 2 Elbert: CO, GA 2 Effingham: IL, GA 2 Eddy: ND, NM 2 Duval: FL, TX 2 Dunn: ND, WI 2 Dorchester: SC, MD 2 Dewey: OK, SD 2 Deuel: NE, SD 2 Dekalb: TN, MO 2 Davis: IA, UT 2 Davidson: TN, NC 2 Dakota: MN, NE 2 Curry: OR, NM 2 Crook: OR, WY 2 Crockett: TN, TX 2 Crittenden: KY, AR 2 Craig: VA, OK 2 Covington: AL, MS 2 Coos: NH, OR 2 Colfax: NE, NM 2 Cleburne: AR, AL 2 Clearwater: MN, ID 2 Clayton: IA, GA 2 Chickasaw: IA, MS 2 Chesterfield: SC, VA 2 Chautauqua: KS, NY 2 Chatham: NC, GA 2 Chase: KS, NE 2 Charlotte: VA, FL 2 Champaign: IL, OH 2 Chambers: AL, TX 2 Caroline: MD, VA 2 Caddo: OK, LA 2 Bryan: OK, GA 2 Brunswick: VA, NC 2 Brooks: TX, GA 2 Bristol: MA, RI 2 Bradley: TN, AR 2 Bradford: PA, FL 2 Boyd: KY, NE 2 Bourbon: KS, KY 2 Blount: TN, AL 2 Big horn: MT, WY 2 Bibb: AL, GA 2 Berrien: MI, GA 2 Berkeley: SC, WV 2 Bell: KY, TX 2 Beaufort: SC, NC 2 Bay: MI, FL 2 Bath: VA, KY 2 Barton: KS, MO 2 Barry: MO, MI 2 Barbour: WV, AL 2 Baldwin: AL, GA 2 Atchison: KS, MO 2 Ashland: WI, OH 2 Armstrong: PA, TX 2 Alleghany: VA, NC 2 Allegany: NY, MD 2 Alexander: NC, IL 2 Aleutian islands: AK, WA 2 Albany: NY, WY I made the list above by running a computer program over a list of all the counties in America that I had.

Is Chicago turning into another Detroit?

Is Chicago turning into another Detroit? The very wording of the question presupposes the answer. The answer is no - but not for any reason given so far. Let’s dispense with the expected part of the answer, Chicago is a great town. I have a lot of friends there. The greater downtown area is pretty nice. It’s got a nice art museum. A nice waterfront. It has reasonable public transportation and reasonably good sports teams. It’s really good at attracting people from the west side of Michigan. Even as a Detroit fan, I will tell you that as a destination for normal people without kids, I don’t think Detroit will be able to outcompete the City of Chicago for a long, long time. I wouldn’t envision Chicago suffering from rapid, massive population loss or getting hit hard by a cyclical industry monoculture. It could, however, go bankrupt for the same reason Detroit did. That said, the words “another Detroit” in the question point to something that Chicago will never have in common with Detroit: national mind share. Chicago has enjoyed relative peace and stability for pretty much its entire existence. It is very functional. I think most people from around the U.S. would find it relatively pleasant (except people who can’t stand extreme cold). As a happy, even-tempered place, “Chicago” has not become a metaphor in the English language. When you can say “another Detroit,” you’re using it as a stand-in for conceptions that a lot of (mostly white) people hold nationwide. They might not evoke an accurate picture of life in Detroit, but Detroit has an undeniable power over people’s imaginations and fears. You don’t get that power from being a solid B+, functional city. That power comes from having a roller-coaster life, of having huge swings between extreme success and failure. Think John DeLorean: one day you’re president of Chevy and the next you’re trading a suitcase of cocaine to keep your own new company in business. Or you’re Jimmy Hoffa - riding high one day, dead the next, and a national butt of jokes decades after anyone remembered what exactly who you were. Detroit is always in the ,New York Times,, but you never know whether it is going to be some horrendous thing or some super-positive development. Spin the wheel. Detroit’s weird and tortured history has led to a ,genius loci, and cultural-historical footprint that are much different from Chicago’s, leading to another way in which Chicago will not be another Detroit (sometimes for better, also sometimes for worse): Detroit’s founder, Antoine de la Mothe Cadillac, hustled his way into the nobility, and over to the new world to traffic guns and liquor to the Native Americans. He was removed from the settlement on account of his corruption and was arrested at one point on suspicion of having set the place on fire. He was prosecuted for certain commercial activities and reassigned to be governor of Louisiana. New Orleans was largely the result. With a start like that… Destruction and rebirth is so enshrined in Detroit that it features on the city flag. In fact, Detroit was pwned by the British in the War of 1812, which gives it the strange status of having been added to the U.S. and then removed from it in record time. Before that war, it had already burned to the ground - ,twice,. The immense wealth of the 1920s gave Detroit an art museum on par with Chicago’s, and it still is. Frida Kahlo got her biggest artistic boost while Diego Rivera painted the murals there. Detroit was unique in having both harbored characters who helped embolden the Nazis to do terrible things and then having provided the massive industrial muscle to defeat the Nazis. The Mercury rockets that launched the first American astronauts came right out of a Chrysler defense plant. Remember what the Nazis were doing with relics in ,Indiana Jones, movies? Ford and Edison were going around the United States collecting historic buildings. Initially as a private playground. Then briefly a school. And then a permanent recreation of the turn-of-the-century America that industrialization wiped out. As a result of this, Dayton, OH does not have Wright Brothers’ cycle shop, Logan County, IL does not have Lincoln’s courthouse, and Menlo Park, NJ does not have Edison’s lab. The museum Ford started now owns the largest locomotive in the United States, the Kennedy limousine, and the Rosa Parks bus, among other tens of thousands of relics. Aside from V’ger in ,Star Trek: the Motion Picture,, there was probably no more avid collector of worlds than the Ford/Edison gang and their nonprofit. Detroit is the situs of a lot of movies, in part due to its reputation for being the Worst Place in the World. They didn’t set ,Robocop, in Chicago; the remake of ,Assault on Precinct 13, was transplanted to the D; ,True Romance, would not be the same in the Windy City, and ,Hoffa,? Ahem. In fact, when Katyhrn Bigelow made a movie about late 1960s civil disturbances, she set it in Detroit. Not all of this is good press, but it’s disproportionate to Detroit’s population or economic status. BTW, Detroit also apologizes for unleashing Jerry Bruckheimer and Steven Segal on the world, though it did give birth to Francis Ford Coppola and George C. Scott. Detroit was the leading incubator of architectural modernism,, having had significant projects by Yamasaki, Saarinen (both of them), Birkerts, and Mies van der Rohe, among others (ironically, Mies’ biggest project was actually in Detroit, though his base was at IIT). This was due in part to Detroit’s habit of knocking down things 50 years (or burning it every 100) and trying to design the ,future,. Take a look sometime at the historic alumni and faculty of Cranbrook in suburban Detroit and you’ll see something of the “why.” A lot of things that dominate conditions in Detroit are actually the results of futurism that bet on the wrong future. Syd Mead of ,Blade Runner, fame? Worked at Ford. Detroit’s music scene is among the world’s strongest - and has been for years. Motown is a worldwide musical currency 50 years after most of those songs were written (I was in Singapore last week, and guess what was playing on the radio…). Techno started in Detroit. And hey, when you look at iconic Maxwell Street scene in Chicago in the ,Blues Brothers,, you see John Lee Hooker and Aretha Franklin, both from you-know-where. The largest rock acts of the 1960s and 1970s got their U.S. foothold at the Grande Ballroom. One of the weirdest things ever is that the White Stripes’ ,Seven Nation Army, is a ,soccer anthem all over Europe,. You can make up your own mind about Madonna, Bob Seger, Alice Cooper, Ted Nugent, Patti Smith, Kid Rock, and Eminem. But there is no way to deny that Detroit drives music. But we’ll save the ,pièce de résistance, for last: Detroit’s achievement of the mass production of the automobile and invention of concrete-paved roads (and modern freeways) basically changed the face of every city in the postwar world. That’s kind of hard to beat. Detroit is not for everyone. It can be a rough place to live sometimes, not so much crime but due to schools and service/retail gaps. It has some glorious aspects and some horrible ones. Similar extremes exist in every major city in the country, just not quite in as close proximity and frequently not to such extremes. But despite superficial similarities to Chicago (using the same language, money, sprawled suburbs, etc.), it is just… different. One will not become the other. It’s possible that Chicago will have an economic (or very likely, fiscal) crash, it’s remotely possible that Detroit will overtake Chicago some day in some economic/desirability sense, but in no event will they ever be the same ,place. ,Not just in spirit but also due to the irreconcilable difference between a Chicago-style hot dog and a Coney Island hot dog. Different worlds. But one thing is certain: the more you hate on Detroit, the more powerful it becomes. It’s that mind share thing. It became just a little bit more powerful when the OP asked this question.

What are the names of the states which were colonized during the British period?

NH, MA, RI, CT, NY, PA, NJ, MD, DE, VA, NC, SC, GA The only states formally colonized during the British Period, which I interpret to mean before 1775, were the original 13 colonies but British settlements occurred in various surrounding territories. Vermont was an independent republic before statehood in 1791, settled by folks from NH before 1775. Maine was legally part MA until statehood in 1820 and British settlements occured before 1775. Kentucky was legally part of VA until statehood in 1796 but It was settled before the revolution as was Tennessee, part of the Southwest Territory until statehood in 1793. Spain colonized Florida by 1559. In 1763, Spain traded Florida to Great Britain for control of Havana, Cuba, which was captured by the British during the Seven Years War. It was part of a large expansion of British territory following their victory. A large portion of the Florida population left, taking along most of the remaining indigenous population to Cuba. The British soon constructed the King's Road connecting St. Augustine to Georgia. The road crossed the St. Johns River at a narrow point called Wacca Pilatka,,, or the British name "Cow Ford", ostensibly reflecting the fact that cattle were brought across the river there. The British divided and consolidated the Florida provinces (Las Floridas) into East and West Florida, a division the Spanish government kept after a brief British period ending in 1783. The British government gave land grants to officers and soldiers who had fought in the French and Indian War to encourage settlement. To induce settlers to move to Florida, reports of its natural wealth were published in England. Many British settlers described as "energetic and of good character" moved to Florida, mostly coming from South Carolina, Georgia, and England. There was also a group of settlers who came from Bermuda. This would be the first permanent English-speaking population in what is now Duval, Baker, St. Johns, and Nassau counties. The British built good public roads and introduced the cultivation of sugar cane, indigo, and fruits as well as the export of lumber. After the revolution, Americans began moving into northern Florida. By 1822, Florida had become an organized territory of the US and a state by 1845. After the French lost to the British in the Seven Years War, it became part of British West Florida from 1763 to 1783. After the United States victory in the Revolution, the territory was divided between the United States and Spain. The latter retained control of this western territory from 1783 until the surrender of the Spanish garrison at Mobile to U.S. forces on April 13, 1813. Thomas Bassett, a loyalist to the British monarchy during the Revolutionary era, was one of the earliest white settlers in the state outside Mobile. He settled in the Tombigbee District during the early 1770s. The district's boundaries were roughly limited to the area within a few miles of the Tombigbee River and included portions of what is today southern Clarke County, northernmost Mobile County, and most of Washington County. I suppose it is possible that a trickle of British settlers might have moved into Mississippi and Ohio before 1775.

What are the BEST tourist spots in New Jersey, USA?

Here are a few that will cover a variety of interests. For history lovers. Waterloo Village, (Stanhope) - This is restored 19th century village that popped up along the Morris Canal. The latter was a man made waterway running across northern New Jersey from the Delaware River to Jersey City. The Ford Mansion ,(Morristown) - This home was built in 1770 and served as the headquarters for George Washington and his staff during the winter of 1779-80. It is now a national historic park and in addition to the mansion, there is a museum on the property that has a nice display of Revolutionary War era artifacts. The Great Falls ,(Paterson) - The falls are a worthwhile sight, being the second largest waterfalls, by volume, east of the Mississippi. Only Niagara Falls exceeds the Great Falls. It was also the cradle of American industry, when the falls were harnessed to power factories and mills that grew up along side them. It is now known as the Great Falls National Historical Park and is the latest addition to the national park system Natural beauty The Delaware Water Gap, - The Delaware River cut this gap into the Kittitanny Mountains over millions of years. The view from Mount Tammany is breathtaking. The area around it became the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area in the 1980's and also features waterfalls, historic roads (Old Mine Road is one of the oldest continuously used roads in the US), historic villages ( Millbrok Village and Walpack), great fishing (Big Flat Brook and Delaware River) and excellent hiking (including the Appalachian Trail). The Palisades, (Bergen County) - These massive cliffs line the Hudson River and offer excellent views. Palisades Interstate Park offers some nice hiking trails that take you along the cliffs and down to the river. This was the center of the US film industry before it moved to Hollywood. The term "cliffhanger movie" comes from movies that were filmed along these cliffs. Bearfort Mountain, (West Milford) - This 30 mile long ridge line offers outstanding hiking and some of the finest scenery in the region. The trails are rugged, but the views from the top are worth it, especially where the mountain towers over Greenwood Lake. Island Beach State Park ,(Ocean County) - Though New Jersey is famous for cramming as many homes as possible near the ocean, this park looks little different than it did when Europeans first came yo the shores of what is now New Jersey. The dunes and abundant shore birds are worth a visit for nature lovers. Other Cape May, - This historic and quaint Victorian shore town on the southern tip of New Jersey is famous for its bed and breakfast accommodations, history and scenery. Atlantic City ,- Casinos and the world famous boardwalk are the attractions here. Princeton, - This college town is full of history and offers shops, museums and restaurants. Asbury Park ,- This long run down city by the sea has been making a comeback. The historic boardwalk is still there and more vibrant than it has been in decades. And of course there is the well known music scene. Liberty State Park/Liberty Science Center ,- Liberty State Park is the most visited park in the state, with great views of Manhattan and the Statue of Liberty. Liberty Science center is an interactive science museum that is great for children The battleship USS New Jersey ,(Camden) - This WW2 battleship was one of the most decorated ships in US history. The mighty battleship is no longer a part of the world's naval arsenals, but USS New Jersey was one of the mightiest of all. Only a handful of the thousands of battleships that were ever built remain.

How did the USA get involved in the Nazi party before WWII?

The American Nazi party was called the “Bund”. Hitler was lukewarm, at best, towards the “Bund”1936 - 1941. the Bund was formed by merging two small groups under the Bund umbrella. The Bund was authorized by Rudolph Hess, prominent Nazi. Representatives of Bund briefly met with Hitler during a visit to the 1936 Olympics. In hindsight their activities might seem a little silly but in the ‘30’s with a world ravaged by depression - Fascism, and Communism, were viewed by many as possible viable solutions to the problems of Capitalism with its boom/bust cycle. Later, as the true horrors of Hitler’s vision came to light, fascism was viewed much less favorably. The Bund established a number of training camps, including Camp Nordland in Sussex County, New Jersey, Camp Siegfried in Yaphank, New York, Camp Hindenburg in Grafton, Wisconsin, Deutschhorst Country Club in Sellersville, Pennsylvania, Camp Bergwald in Bloomingdale, NJ and Camp Highland in New York state. The Bund held rallies with Nazi insignia and procedures such as the Hitler salute and attacked the administration of President Franklin D. Roosevelt, Jewish groups, Communism, "Moscow-directed" trade unions and American boycotts of German goods. The organization claimed to show its loyalty to America by displaying the flag of the United States at Bund meetings, and declared that George Washington was "the first Fascist" who did not believe democracy would work. Kuhn and a few other Bundmen traveled to Berlin to attend the 1936 Summer Olympics. During the trip he visited the Reich Chancellery, where his picture was taken with Hitler. This act did not constitute an official Nazi approval for Kuhn's organization: German Ambassador to the United States Hans-Heinrich Dieckhoff expressed his disapproval and concern over the group to Berlin, causing distrust between the Bund and the Nazi regime. The organization received no financial or verbal support from Germany. In response to the outrage of Jewish war veterans, Congress in 1938 passed the Foreign Agents Registration Act requiring foreign agents to register with the State Department. On March 1, 1938 the Nazi government decreed that no Reichsdeutsche [German nationals] could be a member of the Bund, and that no Nazi emblems were to be used by the organization. This was done both to appease the U.S. and to distance Germany from the Bund, which was increasingly a cause of embarrassment with its rhetoric and actions. Arguably, the zenith of the Bund's activities was the rally at Madison Square Garden in New York City on February 20, 1939. Some 20,000 people attended and heard Kuhn criticize President Roosevelt by repeatedly referring to him as "Frank D. Rosenfeld", calling his New Deal the "Jew Deal" and denouncing what he believed to be Bolshevik-Jewish American leadership. Most shocking to American sensibilities was the outbreak of violence between protesters and Bund storm troopers. ,German American Bund - Wikipedia Henry Ford being awarded the highest civilian Nazi award. Ford and Hitler had a mutual admiration. The Bund’s officials meet the great man American Nazi Party marches Youth camp American Nazis in the 1930s—The German American Bund America in WWII magazine

Which American president has the most cities or towns named after him?

The short answer is George Washington with 59. Andrew Jackson comes in second with 21. Some interesting (maybe only to me) side notes: There are 41 cities and towns named after non-president Benjamin Franklin which would rank him above every president other than Washington. Although Lincoln has a lot of counties with his name there are only four cities named after him. Washington, Monroe, JQ Adams, Hayes, and LBJ are the only presidents with non-US cities/towns/villages named after them. There are 24 cities named Clinton, but none are for the president. Most are named for DeWitt Clinton, a New York senator, governor, and presidential candidate. Nineteen presidents do not have a city named after them. Here are the cities, towns, villages, boroughs, census designated places, and unincorporated communities I could find named for each president. Since the question was about cities and towns I did not include states, counties, lakes, mountains, parks, schools, etc. I also did not include townships as it started to get confusing since in some cases this lead to double-counting. George Washington (59) Washington, DC Washington, AL Washington, AR Washington, CA Washington, CT Washington, GA Washington, IL Washington, IN Washington, IA Washington, KS Washington, KY Washington, LA Washington, MA Washington, ME Washington, MI Washington, MS Washington, MO Washington, NC Washington, NE Washington, NH Washington, NJ Washington, NY Washington, OK Washington, PA Washington, UT Washington, VA Washington, VT Washington, WI Washington, WV East Washington, PA Fort Washington, CA Fort Washington, MD Fort Washington, PA George, WA Georgetown, KY Little Washington, VA Mount Washington, MA New Washington, IN New Washington, OH New Washington, PA North Washington, IA Old Washington, OH Port Washington, OH Port Washington, WI Port Washington North, NY Washington Court House, OH Washington Crossing, PA Washington Grove, MD Washington Mills, IA Washington Park, IL Washington Park, NC Washington Prairie, IA Washington Terrace, UT Washington Valley, NJ Washington-on-the-Brazos, TX Washingtonville, NY Washingtonville, OH Washingtonville, PA New Washington, Aklan, Philippines John Adams (1) Adams, NY Thomas Jefferson (5) Jefferson, ME Jefferson, NH Jefferson, TX Jefferson City, MO Jeffersonville, GA James Madison (3) Madison, ME Madison, SD Madison, WI James Monroe (12) Monroe, CT Monroe, MA Monroe, ME Monroe, MI Monroe, NC Monroe, NH Monroe, NJ Monroe, NY Monroe, OH Monroe, UT Monroe, WA Monrovia, Liberia John Quincy Adams (3) Quincy, IL Quincy, WA Adams, Ilocos Norte, Philippines Andrew Jackson (21) Jackson, AL Jackson, GA Jackson, KY Jackson, LA Jackson, MI Jackson, MN Jackson, MO Jackson, MS Jackson, NH Jackson, NJ Jackson, NY Jackson, OH Jackson, TN Jackson, WI Jacksonville, AL Jacksonville, FL Jacksonville, IL Jacksonville, NC Jacksonville, OR Mount Jackson, VA Old Hickory, TN Martin Van Buren (1) Van Buren, NY William Henry Harrison (6) Harrison, MI Harrison, NJ Harrison, OH Harrison, TN Tipp City, OH Tippecanoe, OH John Tyler (1) Tyler, TX James K. Polk (2) Polk City, FL Polk City, IA Zachary Taylor (1) Taylor, NY Millard Fillmore (0) Franklin Pierce (1) Pierceton, IN James Buchanan (5) Buchanan, GA Buchanan, IN Buchanan, MI Buchanan, MO Buchanan, WI Abraham Lincoln (4) Lincoln, IL Lincoln, NE Lincoln, RI Lincoln Center, KS Andrew Johnson (1) Johnson City, MO Ulysses S. Grant (0) Rutherford B. Hayes (1) Villa Hayes, Paraguay James A. Garfield (0) Chester A. Arthur (0) Grover Cleveland (1) Cleveland, WI Benjamin Harrison (0) William McKinley (1) McKinleyville, CA Theodore Roosevelt (0) William H. Taft (1) Taft, CA Woodrow Wilson (0) Warren G. Harding (0) Calvin Coolidge (0) Herbert Hoover (1) Hoover Town, WV Franklin D. Roosevelt (1) Roosevelt, NJ Harry S. Truman (0) Dwight D. Eisenhower (0) John F. Kennedy (0) Lyndon B. Johnson (1) FELDA L.B. Johnson, Malaysia Richard M. Nixon (0) Gerald R. Ford (0) Jimmy Carter (0) Ronald Reagan (0) George H.W. Bush (0) Bill Clinton (0) George W. Bush (0) Barack Obama (0) Donald Trump (0)

Was there any contact between Nazi Germany and American Nazis from 1933-1945?

It appears to have been minimal. Evidently Hitler was lukewarm, at best, towards the “Bund”, the American Nazi Party, 1936 - 1941. the Bund was formed by merging two small groups under the Bund umbrella. The Bund was authorized by Rudolph Hess, prominent Nazi. Representatives of Bund briefly met with Hitler during a visit to the 1936 Olympics. In hindsight their activities might seem a little silly but in the ‘30’s with a world ravaged by depression - Fascism, and Communism, were viewed by many as possible viable solutions to the problems of Capitalism with its boom/bust cycle. Later, as the true horrors of Hitler’s vision came to light, fascism was viewed much less favorably. The Bund established a number of training camps, including Camp Nordland in Sussex County, New Jersey, Camp Siegfried in Yaphank, New York, Camp Hindenburg in Grafton, Wisconsin, Deutschhorst Country Club in Sellersville, Pennsylvania, Camp Bergwald in Bloomingdale, NJ and Camp Highland in New York state. The Bund held rallies with Nazi insignia and procedures such as the Hitler salute and attacked the administration of President Franklin D. Roosevelt, Jewish groups, Communism, "Moscow-directed" trade unions and American boycotts of German goods. The organization claimed to show its loyalty to America by displaying the flag of the United States at Bund meetings, and declared that George Washington was "the first Fascist" who did not believe democracy would work. Kuhn and a few other Bundmen traveled to Berlin to attend the 1936 Summer Olympics. During the trip he visited the Reich Chancellery, where his picture was taken with Hitler. This act did not constitute an official Nazi approval for Kuhn's organization: German Ambassador to the United States Hans-Heinrich Dieckhoff expressed his disapproval and concern over the group to Berlin, causing distrust between the Bund and the Nazi regime. The organization received no financial or verbal support from Germany. In response to the outrage of Jewish war veterans, Congress in 1938 passed the Foreign Agents Registration Act requiring foreign agents to register with the State Department. On March 1, 1938 the Nazi government decreed that no Reichsdeutsche [German nationals] could be a member of the Bund, and that no Nazi emblems were to be used by the organization. This was done both to appease the U.S. and to distance Germany from the Bund, which was increasingly a cause of embarrassment with its rhetoric and actions. Arguably, the zenith of the Bund's activities was the rally at Madison Square Garden in New York City on February 20, 1939. Some 20,000 people attended and heard Kuhn criticize President Roosevelt by repeatedly referring to him as "Frank D. Rosenfeld", calling his New Deal the "Jew Deal" and denouncing what he believed to be Bolshevik-Jewish American leadership. Most shocking to American sensibilities was the outbreak of violence between protesters and Bund storm troopers. ,German American Bund - Wikipedia Henry Ford being awarded the highest civilian Nazi award. Ford and Hitler had a mutual admiration. The Bund’s officials meet the great man American Nazi Party marches Youth camp American Nazis in the 1930s—The German American Bund America in WWII magazine

How come Republicans never win the popular vote?

Well, first of all, if you're referring to the last seven elections, we should keep in mind that if everything else is equal, you would expect one party to win the popular vote six out of seven times every so often. That doesn't mean things always ,are, equal. When Republicans won five of six from 1968 through 1988, that included percentages of 61%, 59%, and 53.4%. Other than the one Democratic win, which was a bare majority of 50.1%, Democrats never got above 45.7% (Dukakis). In the last seven elections, however, we have entered a period in which it has become hard for either party to muster a majority at all. In four of the last seven, the popular vote winner got only a plurality. Four elections were close, with 2000 approaching recount territory (Gore won the popular vote by 0.51%; the threshold for automatic recount in the state of Florida is 0.5%). In this century, the Republican floor is 45.65%, the same percentage to the hundredths place that Dukakis got. (The Democratic floor is 48.2%, what Hillary got.) Arguably, it is hard for ,both, parties to win the popular vote these days--but in any given election, ,someone, has to win the popular vote. I would hypothesize that the current Democratic advantage is an artefact of the 2008 financial collapse, which led to 2008 being the only essentially forgone election this century and gave Obama a strong advantage going into 2012 as well. (Consider that after the 1929 stock market crash, Americans didn't entrust the Republicans with the presidency again until 1952, and then, it was vaguely apartisan General Eisenhower.) Until the 2008 and 2012 elections, there was little sense of a structural Democratic advantage. In 2004, George W. Bush had just become the first president to get a majority of the popular vote and to break Ronald Reagan's record for greatest number of popular votes won--neither of which Bill Clinton ever did. However, insofar as there is a slight Democratic structural advantage, it is likely because of two factors. Democrats have been increasingly running up the score in cities, and Republicans, in rural areas. However, more people live in cities than in rural areas. Out of Manhattan alone, Hillary Clinton netted over half a million votes, and she nearly did so out of Brooklyn as well. Out of Manhattan, Brooklyn, The Bronx, and Queens combined, she netted 1,697,320 votes, or 1.24% of the national total (or 59.2% of her total margin over Trump). By way of contrast, in 1976--when the Democrat also won the popular vote by 2.1%--Carter also carried those four boroughs, but his net out of them represented only 0.89% of the national total. Carter had to depend more on strength in areas Democrats couldn't necessarily count on. Trump strongly improved on Ford's performance in rural areas as well. But his total net out of the combined states of North Dakota, South Dakota, Wyoming, Montana, Idaho, West Virginia, and Oklahoma--all of which he landslided--was 1,501,904--less than Hillary's net out of the four largest boroughs of NYC. His combined net out of North Dakota, South Dakota, Wyoming, and Montana (453,276) was smaller than Hillary's net out of Manhattan alone. Trump did great in rural areas (and Bush did great in 2000 and 2004 relative to previous Republican nominees)--but Democrats are doing great in cities, and there are simply more people there. The second factor is the suburbs. It's a misconception that Republicans dominated rural America before 2000, but in general, Republicans won before then by getting the better end of a split of rural America, getting a modicum of vote in the cities, and cleaning up in the suburbs. But as the cities have gone more Democratic and the countryside more Republican, the suburbs have tended to be pulled along in the direction of the cities. In 1976 and 1988, the Republican won DuPage County by a bigger margin than he won the state of Illinois by. In 2000, when W Bush became the first Republican ever to win without Illinois, he did carry DuPage--but only with 55% of the vote, as opposed to the 69% Ford got in ‘76. Ford netted 0.13% of the total national popular vote out of DuPage; Bush in 2000 netted only 0.05%. In 2016, DuPage was a blue County, not giving an assist to Trump at all. This can be seen in suburban counties across the country. Other counties that a Republican nominee won at least once since 1945 by a bigger margin than he won its state by--Bergen NJ, Nassau NY, Westchester NY, Washington OR, Clackamas OR, Bernalillo NM, Fairfield CT, Henrico VA, Cobb GA, Gwinnett GA, Montgomery MD, Baltimore County MD, San Diego County CA, and, of course, Orange CA--are simply blue now, and some by quite large margins. Fewer are still red, but by greatly diminished margins (e.g., Oklahoma County OK, Anchorage Borough AK, Maricopa AZ). And that is leaving aside other, large suburban counties that never delivered their states to a Republican but nevertheless used to be bastions of Republican vote--Montgomery PA, Oakland MI, Hamilton OH, Santa Clara CA, Palm Beach FL, Fairfax VA, Jefferson CO, etc. A good summation of these two issues for the Republicans is Los Angeles County, a geographically large county including the city of LA and many suburban areas as well, and which voted for every presidential winner from 1920 through 1984. In 2000, George W. Bush became the first person to get elected president without receiving at least a million votes from LA County since it first gave ,any, nominee a million votes, in 1952. In 2016, Trump became the second. In 2004, Bush did manage to crack a million votes in LA County (while still losing it badly--his vote share in the giant county was 35.6%)--which means that, thus far, no-one has won the national popular vote without getting at least a million votes out of LA County since ,anyone, got at least a million votes out of it. If Trump wins the popular vote this November, he will likely break this ‘rule'--he got 769,743 votes from LA County, fully 115,590 fewer than Romney got. Hillary's net out of LA County--1,694,621--represented 1.24% of the total national popular vote (or 59%--a majority--of her total national popular vote margin). There was no ,state, that Trump won by as many raw votes, as Hillary won LA County by. Not even close--he won Texas, the state where he ‘wasted' the most popular votes, by only 807,179 votes. All told, Trump won 5/6 of the country's counties, many of them 80-15 or 85-10. But he was wiped out amongst the country's largest counties. The only county in the nation casting over a million votes that he carried was Maricopa, and he only narrowly carried it. His next nine biggest counties were Suffolk NY (cast 681,254 votes), Tarrant TX (668,514 votes), Pinellas FL (497,485 votes), Duval FL (436,573 votes), Macomb MI (419,312 votes), Collin TX (364,430 votes), Lee FL (329,554 votes), El Paso CO (318,968 votes), and Brevard FL (318,141 votes). (Hillary Clinton, conversely, carried five counties casting over a million votes--LA County, Orange CA, San Diego CA, Cook IL, and Harris TX--of which three voted for Bob Dole in 1996.) Trump ,netted, over 100,000 votes in only one County in the nation (Montgomery TX)--Romney had done so in three, and Ford in 1976 had also done so in three (40 years of population growth prior). Democrats being wiped out in rural America is certainly a problem in the Electoral College (and, I would submit, a problem inherently as well). But in terms of winning the popular vote, being wiped out in the cities and, increasingly, being shut out of the suburbs, is likely worse. Bush had already been doing worse in the suburbs than previous competitive Republican nominees, but he managed to combine overwhelming rural support and a modicum of suburban support to score his one popular vote win in ‘04. Trump is winning the rural vote even more overwhelmingly than Bush, but more importantly, it seems, that modicum of suburban support seems gone. It is a testament to how unanimously unpopular Democrats are in rural America that Trump came as close in the popular vote as he did.

We're thinking of vacationing in New Jersey. Can you suggest any place other than the shore? We're not beach people.

If you are a hiker, the NJ Highlands offer some outstanding hiking. Many of the trails are surprisingly rugged and wild and there are some outstanding views and beautiful waterfalls that can be reached via hiking. If you are not a serious hiker, but enjoy leisurely nature walks, NJ is laced with old carriage and logging roads that make for wonderful walks. If you are a bicyclist, NJ has developed an extensive network of “rail trails”. These include the Columbia Trail, Sussex Branch Trail, Paulinskill Valley Trail, all of which offer scenic, relatively flat rides. There is also Delaware Raritan Canal State Park, which is a linear park that follows the old canal. You can paddle in the canal or bike alongside it on the old canal towpath for miles. Which bring us to paddling. If you enjoy kayaking or canoeing, there are numerous waters that are ideal. The aforementioned Delaware Raritan Canal State Park is one. If the water levels are sufficient the Big Flat Brook, Paulinskill River, Wallkill River, Ramapo River and Delaware River are a few of many rivers that are good for paddling. There are also scenic lakes and impoundments such as Split Rock Reservoir, Monksville Reservoir, Round Valley Reservoir, Lake Aeroflex, Wawayanda Lake, and Manasquan Reservoir that offer excellent paddling. Is freshwater fishing your thing? Many of the above mentioned waters offer outstanding fishing. Round Valley Reservoir is the southernmost habitat of the Lake Trout in North America. If it swims in freshwater you are likely to find it in the Delaware or Lake Hopatcong. The state has developed landlocked salmon fisheries in Lakes Aeroflex and Wawayanda. The Big Flat Brook, Wallkill, Paulinskill, Musconetcong, and Pequest rivers offer outstanding trout fishing, and some of them have naturally reproducing populations. There are also smaller streams that are full of wild trout. If you dig history, NJ played a central role in the American Revolution and there are Revolutionary War sites big and small. Among the major ones are Ford Mansion, Jockey Hollow (both part of Morristown National Historic Park), Monmouth Battlefield State Park, the Old Barracks in Trenton, Princeton Battlefield State Park, Dey Mansion, Rockingham and Washington Crossing State Park and there are many smaller ones including some where George Washington spent a night or more during the revolution. Paterson Great Falls National Historic Park and Thomas Edison’s lab in West Orange (Now Thomas Edison National Historic Park), are worth a visit for those interested in industrial history and the Great Falls are worth a visit on their own. Edison’s West Orange lab is particularly interesting. Additionally there are probably hundreds of historic homes, ruins, mines, etc. that are worth a visit. One of note is Grover Cleveland’s birthplace. He was the only president born in NJ. The Battleship New Jersey is also an interesting place to visit. If you like shopping, antiquing, dining out and simply walking around quaint downtowns there are the towns of Cranford, Lambertville, Frenchtown, Morristown, Haddonfield, Ridgewood, Mount Holly, Princeton, Hope and Summit. If you simply want to take a nice drive, there is Route 29 that runs along the Delaware River in central NJ and goes through some of the towns mentioned above. Old Mine Road in NW NJ is one of the oldest continually used roads in the US, dating back to its days as a main Indian trading route and is a scenic ride. Another scenic ride is route 519 that goes through Sussex County farm country and for much of the ride you might thing you are in rural Vermont. I would suggest getting a hotel room or an Air BnB in a place like Morristown, Princeton, Hackettstown or Basking Ridge, which will put you within within reasonable driving distance of much of the above. Hope this helps.

What are the downsides of living in Fort Lauderdale, FL?

I’ve lived in Ft Lauderdale since 2013; that’s when I bought a home and renovated it. I chose to live here because when I was a kid my family vacationed here every February. In college, I remember sneaking here to party every weekend during the Spring Break cycle. Still today, I love this place. The pluses include: *diversity— there are people here from all over the world which makes this a great place to experience the different cultures, food, and celebrations. All are welcome here: gay, straight, trans, white, black, Latin, young, old, retirees etc… *cultural activities—if you want the theater, concerts, comedians, etc…we are on the circuit; they all perform here somewhere— the BB&T Center, Parker Playhouse, or at the casinos. *gambling—if you are a gambler, there are plenty of places to keep you occupied. We have casinos and horse tracks. *beaches—our beaches are beautiful and well-maintained. *population—this is the first “big” city I’ve lived in (before here: Atlantic Beach, Tallahassee; and Jacksonville, FL; and Princeton, NJ) and I think it’s amazing. There are 1.9 million residents of Broward County (Ft Lauderdale is the largest city in the county) and it signifantly grows in the winter months because of the snowbirds (that’s what we call part time “residents”) and tourists. February is peak tourist season with the week before and after Valentines Day as the maximum. Crime—it truly depends on where you are and how much risk you put yourself in; just like everywhere else. The weather is a plus and a minus…a plus because of Winter, Spring, and late Autum which are wonderful! An abundance of sunshine and lower humidity make these seasons enjoyable. The minus is—well, there’s no way around it summer; which runs from late May through mid-October…which is also the rainy season. Rain for us is mostly horrendous down pours for about 15 minutes in the afternoons—sometimes a morning shower which is usually shorter in duration than the afternoon storms. And remember we have an abundance of sunshine—don't forget to pack sunscreen! The minuses are: Traffic—It’s not unusual to have gridlock at times during the day. That comes with almost 2 million full-time residents and traffic lights that aren’t coordinated. I don’t think it’s that much of an issue because there is so much here that the need to drive more than 5 miles isn’t something that needs happens everyday. Restaurants, shopping, gas stations, fast-food, hospitals, etc…are within a reasonable drive. I just leased a new car and when I questioned the 10,000 mile limit on my lease the sales person at the dealership said I’d be surprised if you drove 8,000…because the area is compact and what you need is within 5 miles. Hurricanes—common all along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts is a reality. Evacuations are a nightmare. I have never actually evacuated and I’ve lived in Florida for 43 years. As long as you aren’t in a flood/evacuation zone and your dwelling is sound there shouldn’t be an issue. My house was built in the mid-60’s. It’s concrete block/stucco; I have a new tile roof, high-impact windows and doors; and according to the Elevation app, my house is 10 feet above sea level. We should be able to weather a storm and did last fall. If told to evacuate, I certainly would. Sea level rise—America’s cultural wars aside…it’s science and a reality. When there are an increased number days when the sea meets A1A, when costal and intercoastal adjacent streets flood during high tides, and the sea walls that exist along the intracoastal are not sufficiently high enough any longer, there is an issue no matter what the political agenda says. Whether people want to face the fact or not doesn’t matter—the water is rising. And it’s going to be an even bigger issue in the next 20 or so years if procedures aren’t taken now to minimize it. Considering the pluses and minuses I still go with Ft Lauderdale is a fantastic place to call home! And I would recommend it to all.

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